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I am really confused brcause i do'nt know which of the following sentences is correct.
1.That depends on how much money you earn.
OR
2.That depends on how much money do you earn.

I think but i am not sure that the first one is the correct clause.THANKS
Comments  
I think that the first one is correct.
The first one is correct, and the second one is wrong. But I can see whence your confusion arises. As a question, the final clause would have to be:

"How much money do you earn?"

And yet, when we take that question and precede it by "That depends on", or "I want to know", or any other fragment of a sentence which requires a clause to complete it, the "do" magically disappears.

This is a general rule. It applies to all such transformations. For example:

As a question: "How much do you love her?"
As a clause "Tell me how much you love her" (we lose the "do").

This always happens. Okay, so this is English, and so there probably are some exceptions, but I can't think of any off hand. It seems to be a consistent rule.

Rommie
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>As a question: "How much do you love her?"
>As a clause "Tell me how much you love her" (we lose the "do")

How about if the question is a negative one? e.g.

"Don't you love her?"

Is there anyway to maintain the negative sense or we just convert
it to:

"Tell me whether you love her."

Thanks.
Well, I'm awfully glad I didn't say there were no exceptions!

As a question: "Don't you love her?"
As a clause: "I suspect you don't love her".

Looks like when it's negative, only the word order changes. Converting to using "whether", as you suggest, is fine of course. It depends on what you want the containing sentence to be.

Rommie
Wouldn't the negative be in the first part of the sentence as in:

I don't think you love her.
I don't suspect you love her.

Could you clarify this, please?
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Both of those are perfectly valid sentences, maj. Whether or not the clause ("you love her") is derived from "Don't you love her" is debatable though.

Of course it is derived, in a sense, but it's not DIRECTLY derived. By directly derived, I mean the process of sticking a few words on the front, and then tweaking the clause (if necessary) until the sentence sounds right.

I probably haven't clarified things very much. I would argue that "I don't think you love her" is not directly derived from "Don't you love her", since the double-negative sentence "I don't think you don't love her" is itself perfectly valid.

Rommie
Aren't we complicating our lives unnecessarily? Wouldn't two negatives become a positive one? Wouldn't those sentences mean you love her?
Aren't we complicating our lives unnecessarily? Yes. Such a sentence is cumbersome. However I mentioned it only to demonstrate a point. I wasn't suggesting it was a good sentence to use.

Wouldn't two negatives become a positive one? Yes. Mostly.

Wouldn't those sentences mean you love her? Pretty much. "I don't think you don't love her" is (almost) equivalent to "I think you love her"

Rommie
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