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Although it sounds right most of the time to say "I am confused about xxx",
there are times I feel it's also okay to say "I am confused of xxx" ......

I am confused about the difference between Taiwan and China

I am always confused of the difference between Taiwan and China
(as in, I am always confused - pause - OF the difference between Taiwan and China)

is it correct to use "confused of" ????????
if yes, what's the difference between "about" and "of" ?

Thanks
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Comments  
"confused of" is always wrong. "confused about" is fine.
Thanks a lot.
However, the former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice once said
"we take very serious obligation to defend our allies. No one should be confused of that".
Is this one of the exceptions to the "confused of" always wrong ? Thanks
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Seraphin
However, the former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice once said

"we take very serious obligation to defend our allies. No one should be confused of that".

Is this one of the exceptions to the "confused of" always wrong ? Thanks


To me, "confused of" is always wrong, with no exceptions. I'm a British English speaker. Perhaps American English is more tolerant of this expression, or perhaps it was just a slip. ("we take very serious obligation to" is also mangled, so maybe she was having a bad day!)

Any native AmE speakers around?
my bad !! Emotion: big smile
she said "strongly", NOT "seriously" - and DEFINITELY not "serious" !! It's a typo from my part - I apologize Emotion: smile - although the "confused of" part still stands as a correct quote.
Dear All,

How about confused on? Is it also ok?

Thanks a lot
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'Confused about' is the correct collocation.

'Confused by' is probably what Mz Rice had meant to say. We use 'confused by' when we are using 'confused' as part of a passive construction, and can change the sentence to an active mood;
Active
'The difference between Taiwan and China is confusing'
Passive
'I am confused by the difference between Taiwan and China'.
Thanks that's a very good example. Is it also "correct" to say: I am confused "about" the difference between Taiwan and China? I think it's also grammatically correct.
Yes
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