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1.I was confused to think of my situation.
2.He was perplexed to think what he should do.

Do both sentences 1 and 2 mean 3 and 4 as below?
3.I was confused when I thought of my situation.
4.He was perplexed when he thought what he should do.

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fire1

1.I was confused to think of my situation.
2.He was perplexed to think what he should do.
Do both sentences 1 and 2 mean 3 and 4 as below?
3.I was confused when I thought of my situation.
4.He was perplexed when he thought what he should do.

In this construction 'think' should be followed by a that-clause.

Ellen was annoyed to think that Richard could have treated her so badly.
The professor was humbled to think that a priest had asked him for advice.
Mrs Thurton was foolish to think that cosmetic surgery would be painless.

CJ

Comments  

My short answer is 'no'.

I would not say sentences 1 and 2.

It's just not 'natural' English. And it may not even be grammatically correct.

Let me know if you have any questions about my response.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJim

Ellen was annoyed to think that Richard could have treated her so badly.

The professor was humbled to think that a priest had asked him for advice.

Q1) Do both sentences mean below?

Ellen was annoyed upon thinking/when ellen thought that Richard could have treated her so badly.

The professor was humbled upon thinking/when the professor thought that a priest had asked him for advice.

Q2) If "that clause" is used instead of "of", are sentences 1 and 2 correct? and mean 3 and 4?

fire1

Q1) Do both sentences mean below?

Ellen was annoyed upon thinking/when Ellen thought that Richard could have treated her so badly.

The professor was humbled upon thinking/when the professor thought that a priest had asked him for advice.

Yes.

fire1Q2) If a "that clause" is used instead of "of", are sentences 1 and 2 correct? and mean 3 and 4?

That's tricky with adjectives like 'confused' and 'perplexed'. Usually you don't want adjectives that express mental states (confused, perplexed); you want adjectives that express emotional states (annoyed, humbled).

But you want to try using 'confused' and/or 'perplexed' with the that-clause construction that you proposed above, post it and we'll see if it might work.

CJ

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