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Keep your room neat (not neatly).
He dived deep (not deeply)

He works fast (not fastly)

I and many Korean English learners are confused with the correct use of those type of verbs.

Q1) Do you think other native English speakers do not make a mistake with that type of adverbs at times?

Q2) What others verbs in that type are there?(plus, if question sentence sounds weird, please correct)

Q3) Do you use them correctly because you have seen, heard and used those verbs often?
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Keep your room neat (not neatly).- Yes. 'Neat' is an adjective modifying 'room'.
He dived deep / deeply - Both forms of the adverb are available.

He works fast (not fastly)- 'Fast' is both adjective and adverb; there is no 'fastly'.

Q1) Do you think other native English speakers do not make a mistake with that type of adverbs at times?-- That is right, they do not. I have noticed that you ask often about how native speakers choose words and grammar. That is not a very useful avenue for you to follow, since you are not learning the language in the same way that we did. We do not study much grammar or vocabulary when we learn, because we have learned most of the structures by the time we go to elementary school; it is subconscious.

Q2) What others verbs in that type are there?-- I don't recognize any 'type' in the 3 verbs you have presented. What similarity do you see?

Q3) Do you use them correctly because you have seen, heard and used those verbs often?-- Yes.
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moon7296Q2) What others verbs in that type are there?(plus, if question sentence sounds weird, please correct)
The choice of the adverb or adjective isn't so much dependent upon the verb as it is upon the intended meaning. The more concrete the meaning is, the more likely an adverb without ly is. For abstract contexts, the ly suffix is often used whenever there are two adverbs. Consider these examples:

The airplane flew high in the sky. (concrete altitude)

I think very highly of him. (I hold him in high regard.)

He dived deep into the lake.

I deeply regret having said that.

CB
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Thank you Micauber.

As you pointed out, I might have asked questions about native speakers word choices.

I had not studied English like that.

But I started to study in a different way since I started to prepare an exam to be an English teacher.

There are some parts of the exam I do not want to adjust myself to. I don't know why I ask those questions a lot. Probably I wanted to be as accurate as possible when I students ask those question...

Thank you againEmotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Keep your room neat (not neatly).- Yes. 'Neat' is an adjective modifying 'room'.

I think I say 'Keep it(e.g,. the vase) carefully'.(not keep it careful) An adverb is used in the same structure as #1.

Q1) Can I say 'keep your room neatly'? if possible does 'neatly' modify 'keep your room'?

1. Jane was about to knock on the door but stopped short.

Q2) Can I say '~ but stopped shortly'?
Q1) Can I say 'keep your room neatly'? if possible does 'neatly' modify 'keep your room'?-- It is odd. It means 'use neat actions to maintain your room.'

1. Jane was about to knock on the door but stopped short. Q2) Can I say '~ but stopped shortly'?-- No, shortly has a different meaning; it means 'soon'.