Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), there is a roundabout (AmE traffic circle ??), at which the entrance road connects with the road passing the University. This road has two lanes in either direction, and the entrance road has a single lane in either direction.
There is a road sign on one approach to the roundabout, that irks me every time I see it.
"UNIVERSITY TRAFFIC USE RIGHT LANE ONLY"
To me, this has two meanings. Comments?
Stupot
PS: FWIW, for those who don't know, we drive to the left of the centreline here. This is probably irrelevant to the discussion.
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Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), there is a roundabout (AmE traffic circle ??), at which ... irks me every time I see it. "UNIVERSITY TRAFFIC USE RIGHT LANE ONLY" To me, this has two meanings. Comments?

I don't see it. It seems to say "If you are going to the university get in the right lane (and none other)." What is the other sense?

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Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), ... RIGHT LANE ONLY" To me, this has two meanings. Comments?

I don't see it. It seems to say "If you are going to the university get in the right lane (and none other)." What is the other sense?

Right as in "not wrong" rather than "not left".
E.g. in the UK it is usually wrong to drive in the right lane.

Carl Alex Friis Nielsen
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Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), there is a roundabout (AmE traffic circle ??), at which ... those who don't know, we drive to the left of the centreline here. This is probably irrelevant to the discussion.

You mean, "HUG THE WALL, ASSHOLES ON WHEELS"?
"UNIVERSITY TRAFFIC USE RIGHT LANE ONLY" To me, this has two meanings. Comments?

In the UK the phrase is usually 'right-hand lane'. Perhaps that is why.

Alec McKenzie
Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), there is a roundabout (AmE traffic circle ??), at which ... irks me every time I see it. "UNIVERSITY TRAFFIC USE RIGHT LANE ONLY" To me, this has two meanings. Comments?

It seems to have several meanings. Some will imagine a full-stop after University. Some will believe traffic bound for the University should use the right lane. Some will believe traffic from or even traffic belonging to the University should do so. Some will think the "right lane" is the right-hand lane and some will think it means "correct lane". Or it could be imagined that the sign indicates the approach is for the use of University traffic only, that there should be a full stop after "traffic" and that all non-University traffic should use the right lane only.

John Dean
Oxford
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Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), ... RIGHT LANE ONLY" To me, this has two meanings. Comments?

It seems to have several meanings. Some will imagine a full-stop after University. Some will believe traffic bound for the ... that there should be a full stop after "traffic" and that all non-University traffic should use the right lane only.

Roundabouts are constructed for people who cannnot speed-read. "University" and "Right" register, finally. for the chap defensively hugging the left lane till he gets the hang of things.
"UNIVERSITY TRAFFIC USE RIGHT LANE ONLY" To me, this has two meanings. Comments?

In the UK the phrase is usually 'right-hand lane'. Perhaps that is why.

When I read that post I thought the OP might share the political idiocy of our Moyboy, who teaches at Newcastle. Then I realised that intellectual insecurity (superiority-complexioned) might evoke the same reaction, and that the two had the same root.
Outside the main entrance of the University of Newcastle (Australia), there is a roundabout (AmE traffic circle ??),

"Rotary" in MassachusettsE.
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