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I want to know: Could a sentence in the present perfect tense has different meanings under different contexts? I don't really think so. It's like in every native english speaker's mind, in their concepts, there is only one answer for some kinds of typical sentences no matter what context is, since the context would also let you feel that way. I can give you two examples. I think they are typical sentences in the present perfect tense:1) When a person says: I have eaten a chicken. Even though you don't have context, you will think that it means he already ate it . That sentence has only this one meaning. You will not think that it means he ate it, and he is still eating it. Then If he gives you a context, I think the context would also let you feel that it means He already ate it. But if he tries to express that he is still eating it (the second meaning),then you must feel so weird that this person expressed wrongly. 2) I have never been to England. No context for you now. You must think it means I didn't go to England before, and now I am still not there; From past to now, I have never been there. I think you don't really need context to understand the Use of this sentence. However, If i give you a context. Suppose that we are both now in England, and i say to you: "This country is nice, I have never been here." Then, you must feel so weird, because in your mind, "I have never been here" means .... (I already said above). So you may correct me:"you need to say 'I have never been here BEFORE' ". [I am not so sure about this example, because my teacher told me "I have never been to England" mean I didn't go there before. So i can say this sentence when I AM in England right now] But i think you can get my point now? If you don't agree with my thought, then you mean a sentence (two sentences i gave above) has different meanings under different contexts? I hope you can solve my confusion. Thanks a lot!
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Who can tell me is it like in every native english speaker's mind, in their concepts, there is only one meaning for some kinds of typical sentences no matter what context is, since the context would also let you feel that way? In other words, The tense does not really need context to tell us what it means. If it did need context, what good would the tense be to us? But context helps fill in the blanks, the small missing parts?
Dear MIA6
you are confusing yourself more than needed , it is just a piece of cake to know how to use grammar [ especially tenses ] , and how to put the suitable tense in the suitable place of the sentence .
Just focus on what i'm telling you .
Present Perfect
An action that happened in the past : a- and finished in the past but it doesn't matter when it happened
Ex : I have cleaned the car recently . Look at the adverb , it gives you the whole idea of the sentence , maybe i cleaned the car yesterday or the day before yesterday or one week ago [ it is not important ]

b- and still continues till the moment of speaking :
Ex : I have just finished cleaning the car .

In your example : I will explain as much as i can
I have never been to england before [ correct grammatically ] but it is not enough to give you the meaning .
because the situation in which you say such a sentence will give you the meaning ....?
notice :
let's suppose that :
-you lived in china and a tourist asked you : have you ever been to ENGLAND ?
your answer would be : I have never been to england before . [ it means : in your lifetime you've never visited ENGLAND till the moment of speaking ] maybe after 2 days you would go to ENGLAND , but till the moment of speaking you haven't yet
before here refers to the moment of speaking .

-
while your visit to ENGLAND , someone asked you the same question : have you ever been to ENGLAND ?
your answer was the same : I have never been to england before . it is completely obvious that before this visit you have never visited ENGLAND . before here refers to your visit

I hope you understood me well , and got it right .
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FRANKLY SPEAKINGPresent Perfect
An action that happened in the past :

b- and still continues till the moment of speaking :
Ex : I have just finished cleaning the car .

Hi, FRANKLY SPEAKING. THanks for your analysis. But i have a question: As you said: Present Perfect tense represents an action that happened in the past and still continues till the moment of speaking. So you mean an action is still going on when you speak, right? ok, Here is an example: A mum is now speaking to her daughter on phone:" I have looked for you for a long time. Where are you?” It means She looked for her daughter in the past, but is she still looking for her daughter at the moment of speaking? Not really... I think maybe she is not looking for her when she is speaking, but she looks for her recently, from Monday to today, at least she doesn't stop to find her. What do you think?
I got where is your confusion , focus on these two sentences and find the differences between them :
- I have been a teacher for about 6 years [ i have taught for about 6 years ] .
- I was a teacher in 2000 .
[1]The first sentence has two meaning : i am still a teacher , or i am not a teacher anymore .
how would you know ?
Of course this sentence will be included in a speech , that will make the idea clear to be understood .
You told me about the mother who has looked for her daughter for a long time , it is completely obvious that she has Finished looking for her daughter , on the other hand , if the mother said : i have been looking for you for 2 hours , here she focuses on the action , so While the mother was looking for her daughter , the phone rang " it was her daughter " .
[2] The second one has one meaning : i am not a teacher now .
FRANKLY SPEAKINGOf course this sentence will be included in a speech , that will make the idea clear to be understood .
You told me about the mother who has looked for her daughter for a long time , it is completely obvious that she has Finished looking for her daughter , on the other hand , if the mother said : i have been looking for you for 2 hours , here she focuses on the action , so While the mother was looking for her daughter , the phone rang " it was her daughter " .

Hi, FRANKLY SPEAKING. I think I didn't give you the rigiht example to show my point, so i changed my example a little bit. Still the same question: As you said: Present Perfect tense represents an action that happened in the past and still continues till the moment of speaking. So you mean an action is still going on when you speak, right? ok, Here is an example: A mum is now speaking to her husband on phone:" I have looked for your daughter for a long time. I am so worried about her! " {I changed my example, so i think this time, you will not think the mother has finished looking for her daughter} It means She looked for her daughter in the past, but is she still looking for her daughter at the moment of speaking? Not really... I think maybe she is not looking for her when she is speaking, but she looks for her recently, from Monday to today, at least she doesn't stop to find her. What do you think?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You should say, for more clarity:
I have been looking for our daughter for a long time.
It seems that you don't focus on what i am saying . In my replies it is crystal clear , so just repeat reading them with getting attention to every word i wrote and you will get what you want .
As Marius Hancu wrote you should say :
I have been looking for our daughter . [ is better ]