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Hi,

How can I know clearly what a conjunction and a preposition is?

According to Answer.com's dictionary for the phrase 'as well as' :

as well as
conj.

And in addition: courageous as well as strong.

prep.

In addition to: “The rhetoric [of the Justices], as well as the reasoning, is appreciated” (Benno C. Schmidt, Jr.).

Can you tell me what a conjunction is doing is the first example and what a preposition is doing in the second example. If you could tell me what their functions are for the above examples or for a general sentential context, I think I might come to a good understanding of their respective roles in a general contextual situation and perhaps, in a specific contextual situation. I think a conjunction can be said to be a word or phrase that connects a word, phrase, or clause but that doesn't help me much
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Comments  (Page 2) 
hello Buddhaheart... I'm confused with the use of FOR

I know it can be a prep or a conjunction... but I don't know what the difference is.... Thanks ....Emotion: smile
Anonymous I'm confused with the use of FOR
I know it can be a prep or a conjunction... but I don't know what the difference is
In the currently popular, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do," it's a conjunction, connecting two independent clauses.
In "This is a present for my father," it's a preposition.

The average dictionary entry for "for" is quite extensive. Emotion: surprise - A.
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