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Hello,

The following is an extract from the 'Conjunctions' of the 'Guide to Grammar and Writing':
Beginning a Sentence with Because

Somehow, the notion that one should not begin a sentence with the subordinating conjunction because retains a mysterious grip on people's sense of writing proprieties. This might come about because a sentence that begins with because could well end up a fragment if one is not careful to follow up the "because clause" with an independent clause.
  • Because e-mail now plays such a huge role in our communications industry.


1. Could you confirm what the above sentence in bold means, please? Does it mean that the example below it is called a "because clause" and the underlined words are called an independent clause?

2. Are the following words in bold, 'And and Even', followed the same principle mentioned earlier, that is, they are called an "and clause" and an "even clause" introducing independent clauses respectively?

The following is an extract from the 'Coherence: Transitions between Ideas' of the 'Guide to Grammar and Writing':

. In short, mummification consisted of removing the internal organs, applying natural preservatives inside and out, and then wrapping the body in layers of bandages. And the process was remarkably effective. Indeed, ..Their diseases in life, such as smallpox, arthritis, and nutritional deficiencies, are still diagnosable. Even their fatal afflictions are still apparent: a middle-aged king died from a blow on the head; a child king died from polio.

Thank you.

With best wishes.
Comments  
>Because e-mail now plays such a huge role in our communications industry.
i.e. do not use, it's a fragment
Hello Marius Hancu,

I greatly appreciate your helpful advice. However, what do you think about my second sentence? Why do they recognize 'And sentence' and 'Even sentence' in the extract of 'Coherence: Transitions between Ideas'? Are they not fragments as well?

Thank you.

With best wishes.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
1st example: bad, because it does not end in anything.

The other two are not so bad, because they continue previous stuff.
BTW, the 2nd could be rewritten:
. In short, mummification consisted of removing the internal organs, applying natural preservatives inside and out, and then wrapping the body in layers of bandages. ALSO, the process was remarkably effective
Thus, in this case, and=also, showing that it can be written separately, even though it's not a great transition. See lower.
However, a better version would IMO be:
In short, mummification consisted of removing the internal organs, applying natural preservatives inside and out, and then wrapping the body in layers of bandages. This process was remarkably effective. Indeed, ..Their diseases in life, such as smallpox, arthritis, and
Because e-mail now plays such a huge role in our communications industry, we must learn how to use it.
The bolded part in the above is the independent clause that is mentioned at the site that you must provide in order to have a coherent whole.
The because clause is:
Because e-mail now plays such a huge role in our communications industry
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
1. Because is a conjunction which begins a subordinate causal clause. A subordinate clause should normally be accompanied by a main clause. A main clause can stand on its own; it is not necessary to accompany a main clause with a subordinate clause.
Examples:
Main clause - subordinate clause. I didn't go out because/as/since it was raining.
Subordinate clause - main clause: Because/As/Since it was raining, I didn't go out. (Note the comma!)

Main clause: I didn't go out.
A subordinate clause without a main clause is usually incorrect: Because/As/Since it was raining. (WRONG!) You may use clauses like this in conversation but avoid them in serious writing.
2. Many style guides suggest that it is usually not good style or advisable to begin a sentence with and. Marius has already given you good advice about that. Even is not a conjunction and nothing prevents you from beginning a clause or a sentence with it:
Even the poorest people in that town own a car.
Even my stupid friend understood what was being said.
CB