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Hi,

I found out that the word 'wherever' or 'whoever' is a conjunction and an example in use might be this:

Some people enjoy spending mony wherever they are.

To me, the colored part looks like a subordinate clause like 'when they are down."

How could I tell if if a particular one like the underlined word in the colored part 'wherever' is a conjunction, or like a starting word?? of a subordiante clause like 'when they are down'? Should I go for the definition of a conjunction? It saying to be a word or phrase that connects clauses does help much.
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AnonymousHow could I tell if if a particular one like the underlined word in the colored part 'wherever' is a conjunction, or like a starting word?? of a subordiante clause like 'when they are down'?
What you are calling a "starting word" is, in fact, a conjunction!
when, in when they are down, is a conjunction.
CJ
Comments  
Hi

In the example you gave 'wherever' separates two clauses, which is why is functions as a conjunction.

Ex: Some people enjoy spending money + wherever they are [situated/located].
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.