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1. "The English Football team is in a better position than the French Football Team."
Is the above sentence the shortened form of "The English Football team is in a better position than the French Football team is in a position." ?

2. "I will have more than you have money."
"I will have more money than you will have money."
Can both the above sentences be written as "I will have more money than you" ?
Comments  
2. Yes, they may. And then they may be discarded.
Note that the tense difference will be lost from your first version. You'd need to say, "I will have more money than you have now."

1. Your "long version" may be useful in explaining the meaning, but it would never be used by a native speaker. Unfortunately, it's ungrammatical.
Debpriya De1. "The English Football team is in a better position than the French Football Team."
Is the above sentence the shortened form of "The English Football team is in a better position than the French Football team is in a position." ?
Not really. If you want the long form, it's:

The English football team is in a better position than the position that the French football team is in.

(But nobody is likely to use this long form!)

CJ
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But , the long form of "I am a better singer than you" is "I am a better singer than you are a singer"
Debpriya De the long form of "I am a better singer than you" is "I am a better singer than you are a singer"
True. But what is your point? The function of "position" in the one sentence is not the same as the function of "singer" in the other sentence, so the long form won't be the same.

Jack is dining with a much prettier girl than George.
Jack is dining with a much pretter girl than the girl that George is dining with.

Peter walked around a bigger stone than Sally.
Peter walked around a bigger stone than the stone that Sally walked around.

CJ
Thanks again CJ ,
BTW, what will be the long form of "I am more handsome than you" ?
Will it be "I am more handsome than you are handsome" ?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Yes. There's no preposition to contend with as in the other examples.

CJ