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Don't drop behind the others on the trail ---- you get lost.

A) in case
B) lest
C) for fear that
D) provided that
E) so that

I believe B works best, but does A sound OK to you or any other alternative?
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Hi,
Don't drop behind the others on the trail -- you get lost.

A) in case
B) lest
C) for fear that
D) provided that
E) so that

I believe B works best, but does A sound OK to you or any other alternative?

A would be the most commonly said.
B is less common, and somewhat more formal.
C is also said.
And so is E, although it adds a slightly different meaning, ie 'in such a way that you get lost.'

Best wishes, Clive
Trexany other alternative?
Yes. I think the simplest statement with nearly the same meaning is

Don't drop behind the others on the trail, or you'll get lost.

(But you have to add will. I don't know if you consider that cheating.)

CJ
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So you mean all are acceptable. Some say "in case" is wrong as it would mean

Don't drop behind the others on the trail in the event that you get lost. (which is not possible)

What do you think?

By saying "... any other alternative", I meant the given set.
You're right. Even that is possible.

I would mean that if the entire group gets lost, it's important that everyone stay together.

(If you're not lost and you know you way home, then don't worry about sticking with the others, I guess.)
Hi,
You need to understand what the difference between 'in case' and 'in the case that'.

Consider these simpler examples.

I always take my umbrella in case it rains. = I always take my umbrella lest it rain(s). In other words, I'm planning for a future possibility.
I always take my umbrella in the case that it rains. = In the event that / in the situation that it rains, I always take my umbrella. In other words, I look out the window and say 'Oh, it's raining, I'll take my umbrella'.

Now let's consider your example.

Don't drop behind the others on the trail in case you get lost. = Stay with the others to avoid getting lost.

Don't drop behind the others on the trail in the case that / in the event that you get lost. = If you and some other people get lost, then don't get behind those other lost people on the trail, or you will be in even worse trouble.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi, Clive. Then you are disagreeing with Barbara, as she said "even that is possible". I thought "in case" would also mean "in the event that", but you say that it doesn't. Only "in the case that" means "in the event that". Then according to what you said, this must be wrong too, right?

Use a fire extinguisher in case there is a fire. [= in the event that there is a fire, as it is not necessary/possible to use it before a fire]

Give the baby a toy in case it cries. (What does this mean?)
No, we are agreeing.

And yes, your two examples above are incorrect. Use a fire extinguisher in the event there is a fire.

Bring along a toy in case the baby cries. (If it happens, you'll be prepared.)