+0
There is something which doubt me: Is there any chances that a gerund goes after "although"?

My friend has just found two examples in "Oxford grammar finder":

_ Despite expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.
- Although expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.

I thought I had never come up with any info like the second sample. Could anyone help?
Comments  
Hi Belly

Neither sentence is good English. Although shouldn't be used in clause equivalents, use though instead. My suggestions:

Even though I expected the news, I was greatly shocked by it.
Though expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.


The latter sentence would most probably occur in written English only.

Cheers
CB
I think there is a mistake here. But anyway, how could although and though can go with a gerund?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Despite (my) expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.
- Although (I was )expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.
Nona The BritDespite (my) expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.
- Although (I was )expecting the news, I was greatly shocked by it.
There's some situation:

_______feeling tired, she went on working

a)Despite

b) Although

The only answer is a but I still wonder why b is not accepted
BellyI think there is a mistake here. But anyway, how could although and though can go with a gerund?
Expecting is not a gerund. It's a present partciple and though + a present participle is used as an active concessive clause equivalent in English:

Though living in Spain for years, he didn't learn the language properly.
= Although/Though he lived in Spain for years, he didn't learn the language properly.

Some grammarians object to the use of though at the beginning of a sentence; I see nothing wrong with it. Quite a few dislike although + a present participle as a clause equivalent.

CB
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Cool Breeze
BellyI think there is a mistake here. But anyway, how could although and though can go with a gerund?

Expecting is not a gerund. It's a present partciple and though + a present participle is used as an active concessive clause equivalent in English:

Though living in Spain for years, he didn't learn the language properly.
= Although/Though he lived in Spain for years, he didn't learn the language properly.

Some grammarians object to the use of though at the beginning of a sentence; I see nothing wrong with it. Quite a few dislike although + a present participle as a clause equivalent.

CB
But it didn't fit the sample

_____feeling tired, she went on working
Belly
_______feeling tired, she went on working

a)Despite

b) Although

The only answer is a but I still wonder why b is not accepted

Both are correct.

You can use though, although and while in non-finite clauses.