+0
Hi,

It is known to me that conjunctive adverbs which seem to connect two independent clauses can function as simple adverbs and appear parenthetically within a clause; and they also seem capable of being the first word of a sentence.

My knowledge is that an adverb tells what, why,how and what degree apects of a sentence and I have hard time seeing how any of these words fit in the previous definitional paradigm and tells what, why, how and what degree parts of a sentence (especially when it appears alone).

nonetheless, notwithstanding, otherwise, in any event, for example
+0
Hi,

It is known to me that conjunctive adverbs which seem to connect two independent clauses can function as simple adverbs and appear parenthetically within a clause; and they also seem capable of being the first word of a sentence.

It's usually helpful to supply actual examples of the types of sentences you want to discuss.Emotion: smile

Let me begin by questioning your statement above, and considering just one of the expressions you have listed.

Are you saying that a sentence like the following is correct?

Mary hated Tom, nonetheless she married him.

I would say that it should be

Mary hated Tom, but nonetheless she married him.

Or Mary hated Tom. Nonethelss, she married him.

Best wishes, Clive
+0
Conjunctive adverbs, or simply "conjuncts", do exist, and are different from sentence adverbials.These conjuncts link sentences or paragraphs and usually appear at the beginning of a sentence.

The adverbials Anonymous mentioned in their first post, those that tell us something about the verb (why, when, where, how, what for, etc.) are adjuncts (as opposed to conjuncts. Unlike conjuncts, adjuncts are part of the structure of the sentence (from the point of view of syntax); they will appear in the predicate. You also have “sentence adverbials”, which modify an entire clause or sentence and are placed, usually, at the beginning of the sentence).

Adverb: a part of speech whose main function is that of modifying a verb, an adjective or another adverb.

Adverbial: a syntactic function that may be realised by a number of structures (and even single words): adverbs, prepositional phrases, clauses (both finite and non-finite), noun phrases.

Both conjuncts and adjuncts are adverbials, only they are of different types.

Most conjuncts are adverbs or prepositional phrases: however, consequently, yet (meaning ‘however’), firstly, lastly, anyway, nonetheless, nevertheless, meanwhile, by the way, on the one hand, on the other hand, to begin with, to sum up, in short, etc. Even some conjunctions can function as conjuncts, as long as they appear at the very beginning of the sentence (for example ‘and’ and ‘but’). again, these are not part of either the subject or the predicate, but remain outside the structure of the sentence and act as links to the previous sentence/s or paragraph.
Miriam
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  
Anonymousan adverb tells what, why,how and what degree apects of a sentence
I don't think you've got this list right. I would not include what. I would include when and where.
In any case, I believe you may be looking for the term "sentential adverb" -- an adverb that modifies the entire clause or sentence.
CJ
 miriam's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?