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Considering these sentences. ( Do you call them sentences? I mean what would you call them collectively? )

- If I were you, I wouldn't mistreat the iPod. Is it correct to say this?

- It is interesting to see that even in a country, expressions vary from one place to other. Does this sound natural?

- That's our quiet evening in gone for a burton. Wouldn't it sound more natural if you omit the 'in'?

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All you need do is ask. It should be 'All you need to do is ask' right? I heard a native speaker of English said this a few days ago.

Best wishes,

PBF
Comments  
PeaceblinkfriendConsidering these sentences. ( Do you call them sentences? I mean what would you call them collectively? )

- If I were you, I wouldn't mistreat the iPod. Is it correct to say this? I don't like 'mistreat' in this sentence. I might say "... I would be more careful with the iPod." or "... I would handle the iPod more gently."

- It is interesting to see that even within a one country, expressions vary from one place to another. Does this sound natural?

- That's our quiet evening in gone for a burton. This would not be understood in the US. Wouldn't it sound more natural if you omit the 'in'? Maybe someone from Britain can help you out regarding the use of 'in'. http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-gon1.htm

Best wishes,

PBF


Thank you for replying to my post, Yankee. Emotion: smile

For the first sentence, if I want to use 'I wouldn't ...' to start my sentence, what should I say, or I could only say it with 'I would...' ?

- That's our quiet evening in gone for a burton. This would not be understood in the US. Wouldn't it sound more natural if you omit the 'in'? Maybe someone from Britain can help you out regarding the use of 'in'. http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-gon1.htm Of course.Emotion: surprise It makes perfect sense. I found this sentence in Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary. I wouldn't be surprised if this won't be understood in the US. Emotion: smile

Sorry but could you also check my last sentence in my first post. I added it as you were contructing your post. Emotion: stick out tongue What a coincidence!

Thanks again.

Best wishes,

PBF
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Hi PBF

Your last question was:
- All you need do is ask. It should be 'All you need to do is ask' right? I heard a native speaker of English said this a few days ago.

I would probably say "All you need to do is ask." But I believe it would also be correct without the word 'to'.

As regards your first sentence, you could say "... I wouldn't handle my/the iPod so roughly/carelessly."
I heard a native speaker of English said this a few days ago.

PBF


It should be 'I heard a native speaker of English say this a few days ago.'
That's our quiet evening in gone for a burton. Wouldn't it sound more natural if you omit the 'in'?

You must omit "in" - the phrase is "gone for a burton" >>
noun (in phrase go for a burton) Brit. informal be ruined, destroyed, or killed.
— ORIGIN originally RAF slang: perhaps referring to Burton ale, from Burton-upon-Trent.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
In looks ok to me

our quiet (evening in) (gone for a burton)

our quiet (evening at home) (ruined).
our quiet (evening in) (gone for a burton)#

Oops - I missed that! Sorry. You are of course right.