Hi,
Could you help me please?
Is this sentence right?
"I will include more practices once I had finished them."

Do I need a comma?
Thanks a lot.
Irma.
1 2
Hi, Could you help me please? Is this sentence right? "I will include more practices once I had finished them." Do I need a comma?

No, we usually leave out a comma when a subordinate clause like this comes at the end of teh sentence, but it wouldn't be wrong to put one in. According to the rules it is usual to put a comma after teh subordinate clause when it comes first - but, to be quite honest, I often leave this type of comma out.
BTW the word is "exercises", not "practices" in this context. You do grammar exercises for practice (uncluntable in this meaning).

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Hi, Could you help me please? Is this sentence right? "I will include more practices once I had finished them." Do I need a comma?

No, we usually leave out a comma when a subordinate clause like this comes at the end of teh sentence, ... is "exercises", not "practices" in this context. You do grammar exercises for practice (uncluntable in this meaning). Regards, Einde O'Callaghan

I think it needs to be
"I will include more practices once I have finished them."

'Uncluntable' is my word of the week...
DC

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"exercises"
No, we usually leave out a comma when a subordinate clause like this comes at the end of teh sentence, ... subordinate clause when it comes first - but, to be quite honest, I often leave this type of comma out.

Thanks, I am not so good at punctuation :-)
BTW the word is "exercises", not "practices" in this context. You do grammar exercises for practice (uncluntable in this meaning).

Yes, you are right. I will change the word.
I have read the word "better" like verb, and I liked it. I think it sounds nice...
The thing is that I really don't know if it is commonly used like a verb or not.
Do you have any comment on this?
Thanks a lot :-)
Irma.
No, we usually leave out a comma when a subordinate ... exercises for practice (uncluntable in this meaning). Regards, Einde O'Callaghan

I think it needs to be

Not really - because of the meaning of "finish"; it makes the time sequence clear.
And I repeat, the word isn't "practices" but "exercises".

Regards, einde O'Callaghan
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No, we usually leave out a comma when a subordinate ... quite honest, I often leave this type of comma out.

Thanks, I am not so good at punctuation :-)

BTW the word is "exercises", not "practices" in this context. You do grammar exercises for practice (uncluntable in this meaning).

That should be "uncountable". Another typo like "teh".
Yes, you are right. I will change the word. I have read the word "better" like verb, and I liked ... really don't know if it is commonly used like a verb or not. Do you have any comment on this?

"Better" is sometimes used as a verb, e.g. "he is trying to better his chances". It means something like "improve".
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
I think it needs to be

Not really - because of the meaning of "finish"; it makes the time sequence clear.

Would you really say "I will include more exercises once I had finished them"? I'm pretty certain I wouldn't, and I don't see that the time sequence is clear at all. We're starting with a will-future and then jumping two time frames back into the past. It's no like you're saying something like "I wanted to include this when I had finished it..."
And I repeat, the word isn't "practices" but "exercises".

I know, that's why I corrected in the next posting...

DC
Not really - because of the meaning of "finish"; it makes the time sequence clear.

Would you really say "I will include more exercises once I had finished them"? I'm pretty certain I wouldn't, and ... into the past. It's no like you're saying something like "I wanted to include this when I had finished it..."

No, I'm saying that "I'll include more exercises once I finish them" is OK.

Regards, einde O'Callaghan
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