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Hello,

1. It was hot. The match was cancelled.

I have to write it as

2. Had it not been hot, the match would not have been cancelled.

I want to know the rule for making such conversion.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Paco,

Yes. You're right. I misunderstood the instructions. I thought the sentences (in whatever tense they were originally cast) were to be turned into a "Had ..., would have ..." structure.
If the original tense was to be taken into consideration, it escaped my notice!
Thanks for pointing that out.

CJ
Hello,

But in the exercise , it was asked us to convert into "had" ..... "would have" structer.
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(we were asked - not it was asked us) Emotion: wink

OK. Then it seems that I did not misunderstand after all! Emotion: smile
Hello Sir(MR. CJ)

Sir I want to join two sentences using "in spite of". I have some doubt, actually I don't the rule.

For e.g

1. I went outside. The weater was bad.

I went outside in spite of bad weather.

2. He played outside. He was ill.

He played outside in spite of being ill.

In both sentence the verb is "was". But why is the conversion in different way?

Thanks.
Hello,

Need your help!
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Hanuman_2000Sir I want to join two sentences using "in spite of". I have some doubt, actually I don't the rule. 1. I went out. The weater was bad.
I went out in spite of bad weather.
2. He played out. He was ill.
He played out in spite of being ill.
In both sentence the verb is "was". But why is the conversion in different way?
You can paraphrase "the weather was bad" into a noun phrase "(the) bad weather", but you cannot paraphrase "he was ill" into "ill he". You may say also "He went out in spite of illness".

paco
You may have to approach each of these individually rather than rely on a rule.

In general, though, the rule would go as follows, using your second sentence as the model:

Change the verb form (any tense) after "in spite of" to the -ing form.

He was ill. was is from be. The -ing form of be is being.

Remove the subject if it's the same as the subject of the previous clause.

He played outside in spite of being ill. (being came from was. he after in spite of was dropped.)

She stayed at work. She wanted to go home.
She stayed at work in spite of wanting to go home.

They fell asleep. The music was loud.
They fell asleep in spite of the music being loud. (they
and music aren't the same, so you can't drop music.)
They fell asleep in spite of the loud music.
(This is an alternate version that can sometimes be done when the subjects of the clauses are different.)

These formulas don't always work, so don't forget to use your common sense! Emotion: smile
CJ

Hello Sir, (Mr.CJ)

The idea you have given is wonderful. I was looking for it for many days..

It solves my problem. I am grateful to you.

May I write PM to you?
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You are very welcome, but unfortunately at this time I am not responding to PM's.
CJ