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As I walked down the alley, a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

I was walking down the alley when a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

Are they equal? Do you interprete them differently?

Thanks in advance!
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New2grammar
As I walked down the alley, a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

I was walking down the alley when a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

Are they equal? Do you interprete them differently?

Thanks in advance!


As I was walking down the alley, a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

I was walking down the alley when a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

I would rephrase the first sentence as shown above. IMO, the sentences have the same meaning.
Sorry, but "starting attacking me" doesn't work. An attack is sudden, without a preparatory warm-up in which you "start" your attack. The dog attacked you.

A dog ran over and attacked me.

(A dog ran up to me doesn't sound dangerous.)

I was walking down the alley when a dog ran over and attacked me.
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Thanks GG and YL. GG, you made a very interesting point about starting an attack. Thanks for the tip
I'll confess that I was thinking about that thing that fencers do with their swords before their match begins.
Hi Barbara

I seldom disagree with your comments. But this sentence, according to a BrE native speaker, is correct. Is it a case of BrE vs AmE?

As I was walking down the alley, a dog ran up to me and started attacking me.

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I don't disagree with the grammar - I disagree with the logic in terms of the nature of the word attack. It's sudden, immediate. How does a dog "start" to attack someone? It jumps at you, snaps at you, bites at you... all of which are actually attacking you, not "starting to attack" you.

Like "I started jumping off the cliff" - no I didn't. I jumped. (I may have been preparing myself to jump off the cliff, but I didn't start jumping.)