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I think some of the following are slightly incorrect. Please tell me if I'm right and why.

a. The problem is not so much difficult as it is perplexing.

b. The words do not so much rename X as they do elaborate

c. The words do not such much rename X as they elaborte.

d. The words do not so much rename X as much as they elaborate.

e. It doesn't rename X as such.

f. For you to be so discerning as to pick up my faults was impressive

Thank you
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Hi,

I think some of the following are slightly incorrect. Please tell me if I'm right Sure

and why. These are somewhat stylized , formulaic ways of speaking. The second part usually mirrors the structure of the first part.

a. The problem is not so much difficult as it is perplexing.

b. The words do not so much rename X as they do elaborate on it.

c. The words do not such much rename X as they elaborte. No, 'such' much is no good.

d. The words do not so much rename X as much as they elaborate on it.

e. It doesn't rename X as such.

f. For you to be so discerning as to pick up my faults was impressive

Clive
Clive The words do not so much rename X as they do elaborate on it.

c. The words do not such much rename X as they elaborte. No, 'such' much is no good.

d. The words do not so much rename X as much as they elaborate on it.

Is there a reason why 'they do' cannot be inserted?
CliveFor you to be so discerning as to pick up my faults was impressive
'as to' in my dictionary is an idiom meaning 'regarding' or 'concerning.' What is its meaning here?
Clive. It doesn't rename X as such.
My dictionary says this about 'as such': "used to say that the word you are using to describe something is not exactly correct." And in this sentence, 'as such' is modiying 'rename' which is not a word describing someting. Do you still think it's correct?

Thanks for your time, Clive.

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Hi,

The words do not so much rename X as they do elaborate on it.

c. The words do not such much rename X as they elaborte. No, 'such' much is no good.

d. The words do not so much rename X as much as they elaborate on it.

Is there a reason why 'they do' cannot be inserted? You can say it if you want to, but why do you want to? It's not commonly said there. The reason for 'do' in the first part of the sentence is the use of the negative.


Clive

For you to be so discerning as to pick up my faults was impressive
'as to' in my dictionary is an idiom meaning 'regarding' or 'concerning.'

That would be whan it is followed by a noun. eg The police questioned him as to his alibi.

What is its meaning here?

Let's consider an example of 'so . . . as to . . . '

He was so fast as to win the race. The idea is

He was fast enough to win the race.

He was so fast that winning the race was one thing that he could do.

Thus, the fact that you were discerning enough to pick up my faults was impressive.



Clive

“. It doesn't rename X as such.”
My dictionary says this about 'as such': "used to say that the word you are using to describe something is not exactly correct." And in this sentence, 'as such' is modiying 'rename' which is not a word describing someting. Do you still think it's correct?I wouldn't tell you it's correct if I didn't feel I was right, based on my knowledge and experience. Emotion: smile

One way to interpret 'as such' is that it refers to 'rename'.

Here, the idea in the statement is that 'rename' is not exactly the right word. If you want to make your defintion work, I suppose you might consider 'rename' as sort of the "name of the action the verb represents".

eg I didn't kill him as such, I just injured him.

It's a bit like the phrase 'per se', which you might like to look at.

Another and simpler way to consider the statement is that 'as such' refers to X.

Here, the idea is that X is not exactly the thing that was renamed.

Here's a more concrete example.

eg He didn't sell his car as such, he just sold the body, the engine and the wheels.

It would be simpler to interpret a real sentence that did not just talk about 'X'.

Clive
Thank you very much, Clive.

I'll have to familiarize myself with this 'so...as to' expression, as it it just doesn't sit with me well just yet, unfortunately. Some of the following just don't seem right Emotion: crying

He is so angry as to punch me= He is angry enough to punch me.

I was so disappointed as to see him fail= I was disappointed enough to see him fail.

I would be so disappointed as to see him fail= I would be disappointed enough to see him fail.

I am so disappointed as to see him fail= I am disappointed enough to see him fail.
Hi,

He is so angry as to punch me= He is angry enough to punch me. Sounds OK to me.

I was so disappointed as to see him fail= I was disappointed enough to see him fail. The problem here seems mainly to be that the meaning is hard to understand. Why does being very disappointed make you want to see him fail? This obviously needs some context.

I would be so disappointed as to see him fail= I would be disappointed enough to see him fail. Same comment.

I am so disappointed as to see him fail= I am disappointed enough to see him fail. This is the same as the second one, just with present tense instead of past.

C
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Hi, sorry I constructed sentences, without giving the meaning enough thought. I realise they read wrongly.

One question: does the expression express something that could be done or is done? I notice that with your example, you said it was something that could be done, not something that was done.
Hi,

I'd say much of that depends on the tense. The context also often adds clarification.

eg He was so angry as to punch me. (He probably punched me, but it's hard to be sure.)

eg He is so kind as to lend me money when I need it.

eg Will you be so kind as to open the window?

Clive
Thank you for your help.

Sometimes the construction sounds very familiar; other times it does not.

I realise now that the 'to' is a particle (part of the infinitive), and not a preposition, which helps me to understand the meaning of the structure far better.
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