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Hi

Would you say that with is optional here?

I'd like to consult my father first.

I'd like to consult with my father first.

Why don't you consult a doctor?

Why don't you consult with a doctor?

Thanks,

Tom

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Mr. TomWould you say that with is optional here?

Yes. You see it more often without 'with'.

CJ

Comments  

They are different. The intransitive verb is equivalent to "confer" and is probably often a mistake nowadays by people who can't remember that word. The intransitive use is time honored, though. You can consult with your father to talk it over and get his advice. You consult him for his opinion. You consult a doctor to find out what's wrong with you. You do not normally consult with her.

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Mr. TomWould you say that with is optional here?

It's used in the USA. In the UK it is superfluous.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
anonymous
Mr. TomWould you say that with is optional here?

It's used in the USA. In the UK it is superfluous.

Nope. Oxford Dictionaries online show an intransitive use (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/consult ), and the other dictionaries mention no US/UK distinction in this regard.

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anonymousNope. ...

Correct. The Google Books corpus shows that 'consult' occurs with and without 'with' both in AmE and in BrE. In both cases, the version without 'with' is more common.

CJ

anonymousNope.

I've only heard it used by Americans. Like the American use of meet with instead of meet or visit with instead of just visit.

anonymous
anonymousNope.

I've only heard it used by Americans. Like the American use of meet with instead of meet or visit with instead of just visit.

I would not be surprised to learn that the jet-lagged, obese Iowa farmers you meet over there wearing Bermuda shorts with a Brownie dangling from their sunburned necks gawking at the palace guards are not as careful as they might be with idiom and grammar, but, as I said, "consult" and "consult with" are both current everywhere and mean two different things.

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