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Dear Teachers,

1. How many liters of gas does your Harley consume each 50 kilometers?

2. How many litres of petro does your Harley use every 50 kilometers?

- Are these natural to say?

Thanks very much to Teachers,

Stevenukd.
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Comments  
Hi Steve,

It would be more natural and simpler to ask, "What's the mileage of your Harley?"
Yes, I have most often heard this expressed as miles per gallon (or litre, I suppose) rather than the other way around. In fact, American car manufacturers list it as MPG.

What kind of mileage do you get with this?

What's your mileage?

How many miles per gallon do you get?

(I just bought a small car, so I've been hearing this question a lot lately Emotion: smile )
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I know in Germany they measure fuel economy in terms of liters of fuel per 100 kilometers. I'm not quite sure whether the Brits follow suit (i.e. I'm not sure whether that is the standard way to measure fuel economy in all of Europe).

Google helped me find a conversion chart. For anyone who might be interested, here it is:
http://www.teaching-english-in-japan.net/conversion/mpg
"I know in Germany they measure fuel economy in terms of liters of fuel per 100 kilometers."

I find that extremely interesting. I guess if you have a fixed commute of a certain distance, it makes more sense to know how much gas that trip will require. But if the fuel light comes on and you only have 1.7 liters left in the tank, it's helpful to know just how far you'll be able to drive on it!
Hi Del

Although I lived in Germany for nearly 18 years, I was never really able to become comfortable with the liters per 100 K routine. It also took a very long time for temperatures measured in Celsius to become as meaningful to me as Fahrenheit temperatures. lol
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Hi Hao,

You prabably forgot the word "gas" so I added it in for you.Emotion: big smile

It would be more natural and simpler to ask, "What's the [gas] mileage on/ of your Harley?"
Oh Yankee, what IS that short story where the sick child (American? Brit?) living in Europe has a fever measured on a Fahrenheit thermometer and, since he's learned Celsius in school, lies in bed all day waiting to die? Dang, I can't think of it.
Got it! It's Hermingway's "A Day's Wait." Here's the complete text online - looks like there's a few words missing here and there, but it's enough to get by with.
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