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About 65% of kindergartners in the US are in school five to six hours a day. That percentage represents a doubling of the number of full-day kindergartners since the early 1980s. Even just a decade ago, most kindergartners only went for the morning or afternoon. The academic demands of kindergarten also have increased for today's generation of young kids. Regarded now as the entry point of academic life, kindergarten is seen as a time of basic but substantial learning rather than as a soft step into first grade.

Q) I was wondering "also" underlined above is appropriate in the sentence considering the context in the left and right. The sentence before is opposite to it but my question is why "also"?
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Not just time in school, but also academic rigor.

(Nothing was underlined.)
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moon7296I was wondering how "also" can come when 3rd and 4th sentenses don't have in common idea.
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About 65% of kindergartners in the US are in school five to six hours a day. That percentage represents a doubling of the number of full-day kindergartners since the early 1980s. Even just a decade ago, most kindergartners only went for the morning or afternoon. The academic demands of kindergarten also have increased for today's generation of young kids. Regarded now as the entry point of academic life, kindergarten is seen as a time of basic but substantial learning rather than as a soft step into first grade.
Q) I was wondering "also" underlined above is appropriate in the sentence considering the context in the left and right. The sentence before is opposite to it but my question is why "also"?

I'm sorry. I forgot to add the underline.
BarbaraPANot just time in school, but also academic rigor.
"Not" just time in school, but also academic rigor? Isn't time in school different context from the "also" part? (That's why I was wondering how "also" can come when 3rd and 4th sentenses don't have in common idea.
 enoon's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Something has changed: the amount of time. The first few sentences talk about time.
Another thing has also changed: the level of academic rigor. The next sentence talks about academic demands.

Yes, a topic sentence might have tied these ideas together. Something like "Kindergarten today is not what it was when we were children." Then the two ideas of what has changed come under the umbrella of changes. However the "also" does serve to transition you to another topic from the first. It moves you from "time" to "rigor."