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The emperor said, "You have to win the battle, but you are not allowed to lose it. If you lost, I myself will have to lead our army to combat our enemy. And then the first thing I shall do is to get you beheaded!" Saying this, the emperor stared straight at Xiaobao Wei, looking extremely stern. Wei made a courtesy, replying, "Just put your heart at rest, Your Majesty." He continued, "If my head got removed from my shoulders, it is removed by our enemy, not Your Majesty."
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The emperor said, "You have to win the battle. You are not allowed to lose it. If you lose, I myself will have to lead our army to fight our enemy. And then the next thing I shall do is to have you beheaded!" Saying this, the emperor stared straight at Xiaobao Wei, looking extremely stern. Wei made a courtesy, replying, "Just put your mind at ease, Your Majesty." He continued, "If my head gets removed from my shoulders, it will be by our enemy, not Your Majesty."
"Made a courtesy", Nona. Is that idiomatic?
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The emperor said, "You have to win the battle. If you lose, I myself will have to lead our army to fight our enemy. The next thing I shall do is to have you beheaded!" Saying this, the emperor stared sternly at Xiaobao Wei. Wei spoke courteously*, "Just put your mind at ease, Your Majesty, if my head gets removed from my shoulders, it will be by our enemy, and not by Your Majesty."

*You could also say "gave a courteous reply".
Cool. Regarding "And then the next thing", what I wanted to describe is "the first step of the fighting is to have you..." I think it is different to "And then the next thing." How to depict it properly?

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Milky,

speaking courteously is different to "making a courtesy." Between friends, the former is proper. But now the conversation was happened between the emperor and his follower. Followers made a courtesy to their fuhrer, but the fuhrer would never make a courtesy to his followers as a return. Just like the fuhrer was never on his knees to his citizens, who always kneed the fuhrer.
Flag, do you mean "made a curtsey"? If so, it men bow and women courtsey. If not, the expression "made a courtesy" is not at all common.

We can say "made a courtesy call", but that is different in meaning.

Quick definitions (curtsey)

  • noun: bending at the knees; a gesture of respect made by women
  • verb: a gesture of respectful greeting, for women


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    Quick definitions (courtesy)

  • noun: a courteous or respectful or considerate act
  • noun: a courteous manner
  • noun: a courteous or respectful or considerate remark
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    Hmm yes I didn't know whether to pick that up or not, I thought maybe it was a local useage. It is very archaic English - to make your courtesy - to bow or curtsey.

    It probably would be better to change it to made a bow.
    Curts(e)ying is mainly by women, but not exclusively:
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    curt·sy


    Variant(s): or curt·sey
    Function: noun
    Inflected Form(s): plural curtsies or curtseys
    Etymology: alteration of courtesy

    : an act of civility, respect, or reverence made mainly by women and consisting of a slight dropping of the body with bending of the knees <curtsies from all the ... ladies of the train -- Sir Walter Scott> : a gesture of courteous recognition


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    And what do you think the writer intended, courtesy or curtsey?
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