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Hi guys,

I am looking for better way to convey the following message contained in a portion of a letter to an employer.

"I hold a 4.0 GPA and recently received the Hogwarts Prize for Excellence, however I would loathe to let my academic performance define me exclusively. Throughout my tertiary education I have balanced my academic pursuits with part time work and training for...."

For some reason I have a problem with the word "loathe" as it seems apparent to me that it is simply a poorly-placed substitute for the word "hate", as the phrase "I would hate to let.." is commonly used.

Can you think of a more articulate or professional way of conveying the same message? I think the whole sentence would been to be rewritten.

Cheers
Tom
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Hi,

I am looking for better way to convey the following message contained in a portion of a letter to an employer.

"I hold a 4.0 GPA and recently received the Hogwarts Prize for Excellence. However I would be / I am loath to let my academic performance define me exclusively. Throughout my tertiary education I have balanced my academic pursuits with part time work and training for.."

For some reason I have a problem with the word "loathe" as it seems apparent to me that it is simply a poorly-placed substitute for the word "hate", as the phrase "I would hate to let.." is commonly used.

Consider this difference in meaning.

I loathe drinking Coke. = I hate drinking Coke.

I am loath to drink Coke. = I am reluctant to drink Coke.

Note there is no 'e' at the end of 'loath' in the second example.

Can you think of a more articulate or professional way of conveying the same message? I think the whole sentence would been to be rewritten.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks Clive.

I meant it in the context of severely disliking/hating the prospect of academic performance defining a person exclusively, rather than merely being reluctant to allow it.

For example, as I am sure you are familiar:
"I would loathe to live next to a neighbour who runs a brothel."
"I would loathe to let a restrictive contract prevent me from hiring the best person for the position."
"He was already a judge in district court, but I would loathe to put him on the Ninth Circuit because..."

I would prefer to use "loathe" rather than "loath" (as I personally prefer "reluctant" if you were to use "loath" in that context).

Nevertheless I do not feel comfortable with the way "loathe" is used above. Can you provide any further assistance?

Cheers
Hi,

'Loathe' and 'hate' are words that refer to strong emotions. Personally, I would avoid using such emotional terms in an employment-related context. I'd venture to suggest that many British people would feel the same way. However, perhaps in your cultural context such terms are more acceptable.

Instead, I'd say something like ' I prefer not to let my academic performance define me exclusively'.

Clive