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I have a question on the usage of optional words such as "that" and "to" that accompany the conjunction "and".

Please look at the two sentences below:

"I am writing to inform you that I am not an American and I do not have an American wife."

"I am writing to inform you that I am not an American and that I do not have an American wife."

Which is a better style of writing?

Here is a similar comparison:

"She is determined to work diligently and live independently"

"She is determined to diligently and to live independently."

Any suggestions as to which writing style is preferred in formal writing?

Thank you.
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RIPI have a question on the usage of optional words such as "that" and "to" that accompany the conjunction "and".

Please look at the two sentences below:

"I am writing to inform you that I am not an American and I do not have an American wife."

"I am writing to inform you that I am not an American and that I do not have an American wife."

Which is a better style of writing?

Here is a similar comparison:

"She is determined to work diligently and live independently"

"She is determined to diligently and to live independently."

Any suggestions as to which writing style is preferred in formal writing?

Thank you.

1. First sentence is not good. The second one is better, although I would omit "that I".

2. The first sentence is fine; the second has a "split infinitive". Some would argue, for the sake of parallel structure, a second 'to' could precede live. I would not, however.

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The first example of each sentence is how a native English speaker would say and write it.

"Star Trek" set the trend in split infinitives: "To boldly go where no man has gone before."

It makes me cringe, but everyone does it.
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Comments  


I apologize, the second sentence in the second part should have said:

"She is determined to work diligently and to live independently." There is no split infinitive (some say it's good practice to avoid split infinitives, but I have heard frequently that many scholars do not mind them as long as the meaning of the sentences is clear; would you agree?).

Returning to the question at hand, would you say stylistic preference largely depends on the context of the writing as well as the reader? Are any of the above example sentences grammatically incorrect?

Thanks.
"I am writing to inform you that I am not an American and I do not have an American wife."

I don't see anything wrong with the above sentence.

SG
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 Eimai_Anglos's reply was promoted to an answer.