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Hi! Are both sentences below correct? Thanks, Fulvio

1. I asked if I might see the paintings.

2. I asked if I may see the paintings.

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yellowstarstruck

Hi! Are both sentences below correct? Thanks, Fulvio

1. I asked if I might see the paintings.

2. I asked if I may see the paintings.

No. If the first clause is in the past tense, "may" can't be used in the indirect question that follows. Only 1 is correct.

Tom didn't know when he may might need more lumber to finish the project.
Even the experts couldn't work out where the lost child may might be.
Prosecutors wondered whether the new report may might explain the officers' actions.

CJ

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Sentence number 4 is incorrect isn’t it?

1 He might have called her, we’re not sure.

2 He may have called her, we’re not sure.

3 He might have called her yesterday, we’re not sure.

4 He may have called her yesterday, we’re not sure.

yellowstarstruckSentence number 4 is incorrect isn’t it?

No. They're all OK (except for the comma splice in all of them).

Maybe you think that 'may have' and 'yesterday' should not go together, but that's not true.

CJ