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I have just completed a TEFL certificate course and I have always prided myself on speaking the Queen's English - I believe it is called RP (Receptive Pronunciation). However, I was appalled to find that I had answered one of the grammar questions in my exam with an incorrect answer. I need to clarify whether or not it is possible in good English to say "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow" I am not intending to use the "be going to" grammatical form. I am simply saying that Tom will be going somewhere tomorrow. Where will he be going? He will be going to play tennis. If you tell me that I can't say that I will have to (reluctantly) agree with you but I am sure that I say it all the time! My teacher (who is Polish) tells me that it is grammatically incorrect. Is she right?
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Thank you, Tom. You are not the Tom 'who will be going to play tennis tomorrow' are you? Only kidding! Thank you for your post.
Tom will be going to the store tomorrow.

Tom will be going to the movies tomorrow.

Tom will be going to the park to play tennis tomorrow.

Tom will be going out to play tennis tomorrow.

Tome goes to play tennis three days a week.

Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow.

I think it's fine.
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EcoAliI still think that if I ask the question "Where will Tom be going tomorrow? I can reply: Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow.
I want to be very clear about what the underlined sentence means to you. Does it mean that Tom will play tennis tomorrow or that he will only go to the place where he will play tennis later?
Dear Canadian45,

Actually, either, I think! I understand what you mean though. I could be saying that Tom will be going to Wimbledon to play tennis tomorrow. I want to use the verb 'to go' rather than the grammatical form 'be going to' So as I understand the sentence. 'Tom' would be the subject. 'will be going' would be the verb in the future continuous tense. 'to play tennis' would be an adverbial clause describing the verb. 'tomorrow' would be an adverb of time (I think!). Does that make sense? Sorry to dwell on this but I don't like being told that my English grammar is incorrect! However, if it is incorrect I would like to know!
"Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow."

canadian45 said... I want to be very clear about what the underlined sentence means to you. Does it mean that Tom will play tennis tomorrow or that he will only go to the place where he will play tennis later?
EcoAliDear Canadian45,Actually, either, I think! So that's the first problem with the sentence; it's meaning is unclear.

If 'Tom will play tennis tomorrow.', saying what's within the single quotation marks is the simplest and most direct thing to say it. Of course 'Tom is going to play tennis tomorrow.' is the other usual way of saying that.

Going back to the underlined sentence, sometimes context might rescue you, if there is context, but it also might not rescue you. Of course if there is a sentence with a clear meaning even without context, we should choose such a sentence.

speaking of context.....

I still think that if I ask the question "Where will Tom be going tomorrow? I can reply: Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow. There is a semantic disconnection here. The question asks where Tom will go. But the answer, a sentence that I would not use, seems to be telling us what Tom will do.

So we come back to the usual guideline. Don't use 8 words to say something that can be said with 5 words, especially when the extra words make the meaning unclear.

will be going to play tennis tomorrow. too wordy and ambiguous

I understand what you mean though. I could be saying that Tom will be going to Wimbledon to play tennis tomorrow. Do you mean 'Tomorrow Tom will be going to Wimbledon to play tennis'? This sentence's meaning is clearer.

c45
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If we want to mean that Tom will go to Wimbledon tomorrow, but not play tennis till a later day, we just have to make that clear.
I just wanted to know whether I could say "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow" - nothing more but thanks for all the posts! I think that it is OK. I have spoken with the teacher and she is removing the question from the exam. I rest my case!
It was just an exam question and the teacher said that I was wrong! That is all! I am an ex-British Army Officer - so never say something with 8 words if 2 will do! Thanks anyway for the input. I appreciate everyone's help with this sentence. I probably would say t either in everyday English but the teacher said that it was incorrect. THAT was the issue!
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The sentence as it stands is not wrong. Yes a simpler form of words can be used BUT the emphasis/meaning is marginally different. I am a native English speaker too and the sentence can not only be grammatically correct but also the exact form of words (in a given context - such as allocating or describing tasks).
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