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I have just completed a TEFL certificate course and I have always prided myself on speaking the Queen's English - I believe it is called RP (Receptive Pronunciation). However, I was appalled to find that I had answered one of the grammar questions in my exam with an incorrect answer. I need to clarify whether or not it is possible in good English to say "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow" I am not intending to use the "be going to" grammatical form. I am simply saying that Tom will be going somewhere tomorrow. Where will he be going? He will be going to play tennis. If you tell me that I can't say that I will have to (reluctantly) agree with you but I am sure that I say it all the time! My teacher (who is Polish) tells me that it is grammatically incorrect. Is she right?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
What a lot of rubbish!
The problem today is, that no one knows or uses, in speech, the "perfect grammar"
Common speech is used AND taught everywhere, even at university!
"going to" is NOT a future. It is taught as such, which is absolute nonsense!
"going to" is simply a common day use for an intention!
So! Let us put this right!

Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow, is of course, CORRECT! Not often used, but correct.
It is used when you need to put emphasis on something: example
Tom will not play tennis tomorrow. I told you that Tom "will be GOING" to play tennis torrowow!
Anonymous"going to" is NOT a future. It is taught as such, which is absolute nonsense!"going to" is simply a common day use for an intention!
Where is the intention in "Look at those dark clouds. It's going to rain"?
AnonymousTom will not play tennis tomorrow. I told you that Tom "will be GOING" to play tennis torrowow!
That make no sense.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AnonymousWhat a lot of rubbish!The problem today is, that no one knows or uses, in speech, the "perfect grammar"Common speech is used AND taught everywhere, even at university!"going to" is NOT a future. It is taught as such, which is absolute nonsense!"going to" is simply a common day use for an intention!So! Let us put this right!Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow, is of course, CORRECT! Not often used, but correct.It is used when you need to put emphasis on something: exampleTom will not play tennis tomorrow. I told you that Tom "will be GOING" to play tennis torrowow!
Dear Anon;

Please be polite in your posts. Using "shouting" capitals and derogatory words such as "rubbish" and "nonsense" will result in your posts being discarded. It does not help if you shout at threads that are more than three years stale.
And it's especially ironic since much of your information matches your own opinions.
"I say it all the time!" Shouldn't that be "I say it all of the time!" ? Just wondering.
Anonymous"I say it all the time!" Shouldn't that be "I say it all of the time!" ?
No, both are fine and common. The first is merely more informal.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.