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I have just completed a TEFL certificate course and I have always prided myself on speaking the Queen's English - I believe it is called RP (Receptive Pronunciation). However, I was appalled to find that I had answered one of the grammar questions in my exam with an incorrect answer. I need to clarify whether or not it is possible in good English to say "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow" I am not intending to use the "be going to" grammatical form. I am simply saying that Tom will be going somewhere tomorrow. Where will he be going? He will be going to play tennis. If you tell me that I can't say that I will have to (reluctantly) agree with you but I am sure that I say it all the time! My teacher (who is Polish) tells me that it is grammatically incorrect. Is she right?
AnonymousThe problem is that you have a "double future," since "is going to" is already a future statement
No. He already explained that that wasn't the meaning he intended. Read his post again.

The sentence is fine.

CJ
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The sentence "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow." is not correct. The problem is that you have a "double future," since "is going to" is already a future statement (thus you don't need to also add a "will" to it). So you either say, "Tom is going to play tennis tomorrow." or Tom will play tennis tomorrow." - but not "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow."
Note that you can say, "He will be going to the tennis courts tomorrow." - "will be going" is future tense, and "to the tennis courts" is an adverbial phrase modifying the verb. However, you can't say, "He will be going to play tennis tomorrow." because "is going to" is already future and equivalent to the single word "will." So you have essentially said: He will will play tennis tomorrow."
I like this answer! Little Miss Perfect doesn't like to be wrong!Emotion: big smile
Welcome to English Forums, EcoAli.

RP = Received Pronunciation (BBC English). I don't quite see the connection with grammar.
Hi EcoAli

You might find this link interesting.

http://www.english-test.net/forum/ftopic77068.html

Tom
You're right! It was a bit of a long bow! I simply meant that I have always prided myself on speaking proper English - I am English - and it was a real shock to get one of the grammar questions wrong in my exam. I like CalifJim's answer. The point is that I am not actually intending to use the 'be going to' form of the verb. The actual question in the exam was: Correct the following English sentence: "Tom will be going to playing tennis tomorrow". Of course one solution is "Tom is going to play tennis tomorrow" but I felt that changed the meaning too much. Actually, I did not think! I just changed it to "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow" taking away the -ing on playing to bring it to the bare infinitive or base form of the verb. I still think that if I ask the question "Where will Tom be going tomorrow? I can reply: Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow. Sorry to be a little pedantic but I don't like to be wrong too often as far as English is concerned!!!!
The sentence, "Tom will be going to play tennis tomorrow.", at first glance, seems okay, but when you run it across your tongue a few times, you see that it's not. This is not proper English. This is the kind of thing that non-native speakers will come up with, things that are almost grammatical, but that a native speaker would not say. I see your logic here. You want to simply say that he's going somewhere. But this is just one of those things that are not acceptable usage. It seems okay, but this will cause a native speaker to look a little puzzled after a few seconds, because it doesn't quite register, since it's not the way native speakers talk.
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