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Which is the correct grammar in this sentence:
As both products are good, order the cheaper/cheapest one from the more/most competent of the two clerks.
Help me please!!! Emotion: sad
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cheaper

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You are only contrasting two objects. More than that and you'd be wanting to use the other options.
Cheapest and most
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GuestWhich is the correct grammar in this sentence:
As both products are good, order the cheaper/cheapest one from the more/most competent of the two clerks.

what makes you think one way is correct and the others incorrect?

sam
Sohy is correct. A comparison between two uses cheaper, a comparison between three or more uses cheapest.

Similarly, if I say "my older sister", I mean I have only one sister and I am younger than two. If I say "my oldest sister", I mean I have more than one sister and I'm referring to the one born first.
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I think it should be "elder"/"eldest" instead of "older"/"oldest". Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Hmmm. As a native British speaker, "older sister" is what comes out instinctively here, but I realise 'elder' is more grammatically correct in this context. Sorry to confuse things - that was a poor choice of example on my part.
Hi all

British: my elder sister
American: my older sister

Cheers
CB
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