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I read in a magazine translated by a non -native speaker a sentence which I don't understand :

A / The Ministry of Education and Training estimates that 20% of graduates are at the level of grades 2 and 3 out of a seven grade scale , with grade 7 the highest .

B/ Big companies only recruit workers at/with skill level of 3/7 ( skill level of three out of seven ) .

Are these sentences correct ? If they are not correct , please correct them

I would appreciate it very much if anyone helps me with this
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Comments  
The first sentence is correct.
The second sentence should read: "...with a skill level of..."
TuongvanI read in a magazine translated by a non -native speaker a sentence which I don't understand :

A / The Ministry of Education and Training estimates that 20% of graduates are at the level of grades 2 and 3 out of a seven grade scale , with grade 7 the highest .

B/ Big companies only recruit [only] workers at/with skill level of 3/7 ( skill level of three out of seven ) .

Are these sentences correct ? If they are not correct , please correct them

I would appreciate it very much if anyone helps me with this

The sentence is understandable as it stood, but I prefer to place the word 'only' closer to what it is modifying.
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TuongvanI read in a magazine translated by a non -native speaker a sentence which I don't understand :

A / The Ministry of Education and Training estimates that 20% of graduates are at the level of grades 2 and 3 out of a seven grade scale , with grade 7 the highest .

B/ Big companies only recruit workers at/with skill level of 3/7 ( skill level of three out of seven ) .

Are these sentences correct ? If they are not correct , please correct them

I would appreciate it very much if anyone helps me with this

Hi Tuongvan,

This is my version for your reference:

A - The Ministry of Education and Training estimates on an evaluation scale from 1 to 7, with 7 being the highest, 20% of graduates are performing at the 2 and 3 level .

B- Big companies only recruit workers with a minimum skill level of 3 or higher based on this scale. .
Thank you Philip.

By the way , please tell me whether these sentences are okay :

A/ Workers at level of grade 2 can be recruited by this factory

B/ Workers with level of grade 2 can be recruited by this factory

C/ Workers with /at skill level of two out of seven (skill level of 2/7 ) can be recruited by this factory

D/ This worker is of grade two out of seven (=this worker is of grade 2/7 )

E/ This worker is on grade two out of seven (=this worker is on grade 2/7 )

Are there any other ways that are better ? Please help

Thanks in advance
TuongvanBy the way , please tell me whether these sentences are okay :

A/ Workers at a (minimum) level of grade 2 can be recruited by this factory

B/ Workers with a (minimum) level of grade 2 can be recruited by this factory

C/ Workers with/at a (minimum) skill level of two out of seven (skill level of 2/7 ) can be recruited by this factory

D/ This worker is of (at) grade two out of seven (=this worker is of grade 2/7 )

E/ This worker is on (at) grade two out of seven (=this worker is on grade 2/7 )

Are there any other ways that are better ? Please help

Hi Tuongvan
My suggestions are inside the quote above.

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Thank you Yankee.But can I say :

a/ This worker is at grade 4 out of 7 , so his salary is higher than mine because I am only at grade 2 out of 7 .

b/ This worker is on grade 4 out of 7 , so his salary is higher than mine because I am only on grade 2 out of 7 .

By the way I see this sentence :

She is still on a secretarial grade. What does it mean in this case ?

Thanks Emotion: smile
TuongvanThank you Yankee.But can I say :

a/ This worker is at grade 4 out of 7 , so his salary is higher than mine because I am only at grade 2 out of 7 .

b/ This worker is on grade 4 out of 7 , so his salary is higher than mine because I am only on grade 2 out of 7 .

By the way I see this sentence :

She is still on a secretarial grade. What does it mean in this case ?

Thanks Emotion: smile
Hi Van,

First, as you said, 'on' is used by some people. However, I think 'at' is better as Amy suggested. Below is my reason:

When we use 'on', we relate to something that is below / under / beneath / etc... Therefore, when we deal with ranking, it is better to use 'at'. Compare 'at the top' and 'on the top', I think you would agree that 'at the top of the class' means 'first', while 'on the top of the class' might not be precise.

That said, I would suggest an alternative to your sentence as follows:

Out of 7 paygrades, my grade-2 salary is lesser / lower than that of this grade-4 worker / this grade-4 worker's.

The new sentence removes a) 'out of 7' repetition, b) the potential confusion of using wrong prepositions, c) and it is more compact.

What do you think?

All the best,
Hoa Thai
Thank you teacher Hoa Thai,

I have checked again the word "grade "in the Cambridge dictionary.And I find an example of the use of grade as follows:

Bill has been UK on/ US at the same grade for several years now .

Perhaps British people use on and American people use at . Or this sentence has other meaning ? I 'm very confused now.

Thanks
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