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Can one use the following statement:
"Our practise makes yours perfect"
This is a play on words. I refer to "Our PRACTISE" as being what we do to help your PRACTICE (say medical).
I realise using "We practise" and "I practise" is correct, but can one use the word "Our" in the above example?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Not to my way of thinking. In that sentence, practice is a noun. It should only ever be spelt with an "s" when it's a verb... well - that's what I remember from primary school.
This should make it clearer for you, Anon:

http://www.wordreference.com/definition/practise

MrP
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Thank goodness we Americans don't need to fuss over this. In American English there is no such word as "practise". Emotion: smile
Point of fact: American English allows the use of both forms, but whereas we Brits use each
correctly, Americans are forgiven for getting them wrong.
No. Practise is a verb, practice is the noun. So you can say I practise, you practise etc. when you are talking about someone doing something. When that something is practice, the c is used instead of s. So the sign should read our practice makes yours perfect.
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You use the word incorrectly, so no, you can't have that as a slogan if you want it to mean anything. 'Practise' is a verb and 'practice' is a noun. (Mr Pedantic was close on the money, but they are not used interchangeably: only 'practice' can be both noun and verb. 'Practise' is ALWAYS a verb.) Eg. "The fact that we practise gives us a lot of practice."

In your slogan, you are using it as a noun. Therefore, it MUST be spelt 'practice'. If you really, really want to spell it 'practise' and be correct, you must change the structure to make it a verb. For example, "Us practising makes yours perfect". Not as catchy, really.
If I'm not mistaken, British people use the spelling PRACTISE while Americans use PRACTICE.
no.. when we use our- it becomes a noun.. use practice..
our practice makes us perfect..
our regular practising will make us perfect
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It may be a bit late now, over 4 years, but I still feel I should reply. I understand what you are saying, and as you are using practice as a play on words I see no problem with our being used instead of I as you are substituting the correct spelling for the pun. When spoken the sentance would still make sense so I'd say it is acceptable.
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