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Hi teachers, please tell me which of the following are correct?

1. I have attached the article for my presentation.
2. I have attached the article I will be presenting on.
3. Please find the attached article for my presentation.
4. Please find attached the article for my presentation.
5. Please find attached a copy of the article for my presentation.
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Comments  
All are correct except number 3.
"Please find attached" or "please find enclosed" is a correct but awkward phrase used exclusively for correspondence. It should not be split.
By splitting it in #3, it sounds like a request for the reader to go searching for the article, similar to "please find my lost dog."
1. I have attached the article for my presentation.
2. I have attached the article I will be presenting on. No.
3. Please find the attached article for my presentation.
4. Please find attached the article for my presentation.
5. Please find attached a copy of the article for my presentation.

Numbers 1, 3, 4, and 5 are quite awkward.

I prefer this:
My presentation is based on the attached article.
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AlpheccaStarsI prefer this:My presentation is based on the attached article.
Thank you. But I am not sure why you think that they are awkward. A lot of my teachers send me emails with a similar format. For example, Please find attached a copy of the article that is for tomorrow's discussion.

If I am sending a message to a teacher, should I use what you prefer? I feel that the examples I wrote would also work. Do you think they are awkward in the case of sending a message to a teacher?
"Please find attached" is somewhat old-fashioned business phrasing. As an idiom it's not wrong per se, but I agree with AlpheccaStars that there's usually a more comfortable and direct way to mention attachments. The fact that the article is attached doesn't need to be the subject of the sentence, that's already clear. You can start the sentence with how it relates to the presentation, as in her example.

That said, if your teachers use this phrase commonly it would not be inappropriate to use it yourself, even if it is clumsy.
Anonymous Please find attached a copy of the article that is for tomorrow's discussion.
"Please find attached.." is typical of Indian English, which has a style that Americans find old-fashioned.

American English is much more direct and to the point. In a business email I would not ask someone to "find" an attachment as if it took some effort to do so, or was somehow "lost" in the system.
An attachment is usually pretty obvious in any reasonable Email system. You don't even have to read the email to know that there is a document or photo attached.
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AlpheccaStars"Please find attached.." is typical of Indian English, which has a style that Americans find old-fashioned.
Hm, fair enough! Perhaps "traditional" or "formal" is a better descriptor.
AlpheccaStarsAmerican English is much more direct and to the point. In a business email I would not ask someone to "find" an attachment as if it took some effort to do so, or was somehow "lost" in the system.An attachment is usually pretty obvious in any reasonable Email system. You don't even have to read the email to know that there is a document or photo attached.
I see, thanks. Then what do I say if the purpose of my email to my instructor is the attached article?
For example, If he requested for a specific article, sendind a completed assignment, or a document/article that my presentation is based on.

Also, just curious, why is this sentence wrong: I have attached the article that I will be talking about/presenting on. Is this sentence grammaticaly wrong?
Sijay AlpheccaStars"Please find attached.." is typical of Indian English, which has a style that Americans find old-fashioned.Hm, fair enough! Perhaps "traditional" or "formal" is a better descriptor.
Indian English hearkens back to the Victorian era, before the country won its independence. Their present-day speech patterns and styles remind me of the language of the highly educated British authorities of that day and age.
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