+0
Dear teachers,

Would you please tell which sentences are wrong and why?

1 a) I feel better since I moved house.

b) I am feeling much better since I have moved house.

(if both are correct what would be the difference between them, please?)

2. She no longer visits since she got married. (is it possible to use the simple present here with “since”?)

3. She doesn't come and see us (anymore) now that she is / has got (possible too?) married.

4a) It is / has been twenty years since I have seen her.

b) It is / has been twenty years since I last saw her.

(are all four versions correct ? If yes, is there a difference in meaning between them?)

5) Whether she plays on Saturday (is “or not” necessary here ?) depends on what her doctor says.

6) I've been miserable ever since my family died in a car crash.

(correct ? or would you rather put “depressed”, “My life has been shattered”)

Many thanks,

Hela
1 2 3 4
Comments  (Page 2) 
Hi all

There are no grammatical restrictions on the causal use of since in a sentence which is composed of a main clause followed by a subordinate clause. In other words, if it is correct English to say I feel better because I moved house, it is also correct to use since instead of because.

A temporal since would require a change of tense: I have felt better since I moved house.

Cheers
CB
Cool BreezeHi all

There are no grammatical restrictions on the causal use of since in a sentence which is composed of a main clause followed by a subordinate clause. In other words, if it is correct English to say I feel better because I moved house, it is also correct to use since instead of because.

A temporal since would require a change of tense: I have felt better since I moved house.

Cheers
CB
OR

I have been feeling better since I moved house.

Can it have anything to do with the verb "feel" or "visit"? Can certain verbs be used that way?

- I feel better since I moved house.

- She no longer visits since she got married.

['since' as a conjuntion of time]
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Cool BreezeA temporal since would require a change of tense: I have felt better since I moved house.
Hi CB
I agree that I have felt better since I moved house is also grammatically correct (although the present perfect continuous would probably be more natural than the present perfect simple).

However, there is nothing wrong or even unusual in using 'since' as a temporal in the sentence 'I feel better since I moved house'. I can assure you, a native speaker would understand the temporal sense of 'since'. I'd say that is related to the sense of the verb 'feel' itself. You'd have to give a lot of additional context to force a native speaker to understand 'because' in that sentence.

Out of curiosity, how do you evaluate sentences such as these:
How long is it since you moved house?
How long has it been since you moved house?

Do you consider the first sentence to be wrong? (I don't.) Certainly you would not understand 'because' in the first sentence.

EDIT:
One more thought:
When 'since' is used with the meaning of 'because' it would typically be used at the beginning of the sentence. As far as I know there is no 'rule' that requires this placement, but it would be the most typical.
Hello everyone,

I'm glad to see that even native speakers have different interpretations of the conjunction "since" in the above sentences. My problem is that grammar rules advise not to use the present tense with the conjunction of time "since" and this is the reason of my confusion. But could it be that the present simple or progressive are possible only with state verbs --though "visit" is not a state verb ?

What would you say:

1) She looks quite different since her illness.

(possible? = time clause ?)

2) He is shooting the most expensive film since Star Wars.

3) My mother looks younger since she dyed her hair.

(“since” here introduces a time clause or a reason clause ?)

4) He looks much younger since he shaved off his beard. (could this be a time clause ?)

Thank you for your help.

Hela
Hi Hela,

I don't know what Yankee knows but I hope this might help..
13 present perfect and present tense

To say how long something has continued, we can use the present perfect, but not the present continuous or present simple.

She has been waiting for an hour. (Not: She is waiting for an hour.)

I've lived here since last year. (Not: I live here since last year.)

The Heineman English Grammar
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi Hela

First of all, the most common verb tense to use with since (temporal) is the present perfect (or present perfect continuous). This is a well-known rule and also works most of the time. However, ruling out all other verb tenses completely would be a mistake.

The four sentences you've now added are also fine.

As I see it, in 1) you are describing a perceived permanent change in state (appearance) -- a fact as it is peceived now. Using 'since' simply gives you a reference point for the time when this permanent change in state took place. Sentences 3 and 4 are similar.

There are some common usages of 'since' where the present perfect would not be used:
My kids think that the cell phone is the greatest thing since sliced bread.
Since when do you have the right to tell me what to do?


In your sentence 'She no longer visits since she got married', you would lose some of the meaning if you used the present perfect (i.e. the sense of a regular, repeated past activity -- a past habit -- would be lost):

She hasn't visited since she got married. --> This sentence simply states that there has not been one visit since her marriage. There is no indication of a change in habitual activity and a 'new habitual state'.

Again, I agree that the present perfect and the present perfect continuous are the most frequent partners with the temporal 'since', but exceptions do exist and I think you've done a good job sensing where those exceptions might come into play.Emotion: smile

Yankee You'd have to give a lot of additional context to force a native speaker to understand 'because' in that sentence.

Out of curiosity, how do you evaluate sentences such as these:
How long is it since you moved house?
How long has it been since you moved house?

Do you consider the first sentence to be wrong? (I don't.) Certainly you would not understand 'because' in the first sentence.

Hi Yankee

I am used to the fact that there is disagreement on acceptable or correct usage among native and nonnative speakers and I don't consider it a problem. It's life.Emotion: smile There are hundreds of millions of native speakers of English around the world; how could they possibly agree on everything? It wouldn't be difficult for me to find one that agrees with me. I don't mean that I am the only one who is right as there is no ultimate truth on many linguistic things. We just see things differently, which is no big deal to me.

As to your sentences, I see nothing wrong with them. Sincecan't cause ambiguity since Emotion: smileHow long is it because you moved house? does not make sense.

Cheers
CB
Just a side note that has nothing to do with tenses: in American English "to move houses" isn't idiomatic.

... since I moved.

... since I moved into my new house.

... since I moved out of that house.

... since I moved my mobile home to a new lot.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
And by the way, you might be interested in this thread: Since - The final truth
Show more