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Dear teachers,

Would you please tell which sentences are wrong and why?

1 a) I feel better since I moved house.

b) I am feeling much better since I have moved house.

(if both are correct what would be the difference between them, please?)

2. She no longer visits since she got married. (is it possible to use the simple present here with “since”?)

3. She doesn't come and see us (anymore) now that she is / has got (possible too?) married.

4a) It is / has been twenty years since I have seen her.

b) It is / has been twenty years since I last saw her.

(are all four versions correct ? If yes, is there a difference in meaning between them?)

5) Whether she plays on Saturday (is “or not” necessary here ?) depends on what her doctor says.

6) I've been miserable ever since my family died in a car crash.

(correct ? or would you rather put “depressed”, “My life has been shattered”)

Many thanks,

Hela
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Hi Barb

I agree with you. I have heard 'move house' from Brits, though. I've also heard 'removal van' rather than the more American 'moving van'. (I remember being quite entertained by that one when I first heard it.) Emotion: smile
Ah, well, Yankee - what do you expect from a country that drinks beer at room temperature? Emotion: big smile
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Thank you everyone for your contribution.

I notice that even among native speakers there might be some disagreement but is this a matter of dialect: some usages are accepted in American English and not in British English; or is it a matter of idiolect: personal choice even among the same community?

Thank you Grammar Geek for the link, it answers exactly the question I have been asking myself for days. Emotion: smile

See you soon,

Hela
what do you expect from a country that drinks beer at room temperature?

Oh yeah?

An American tourist (from Pennsylvania) goes into a bar in London and says 'Bring me the nearest thing you have to American beer'.

So the barman brings her a glass of water.Emotion: big smile

Clive
HelaThank you Grammar Geek for the link, it answers exactly the question I have been asking myself for days. Emotion: smile
Hi Hela
That the link deals directly with the use of past tense vs. present perfect in a time (since) clause. I've been commenting on your usage of tense outside the 'since' clause.

Here are some further examples (from Google and the BNC):

- Since the merger, they no longer issue separate P+L statements.

- Why am I no longer allergic to cats since I had laser eye surgery? Emotion: smile

- Seems a long long time since we used to do it.

- CELTIC savoured victory over Hibs at Parkhead last night for the first time since Liam Brady took over as manager, thanks to a couple of well-taken goals from Andy Payton.

- This session will be his fifth with Boltwood since February.
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Grammar GeekJust a side note that has nothing to do with tenses: in American English "to move houses" isn't idiomatic.

... since I moved.

... since I moved into my new house.

... since I moved out of that house.

... since I moved my mobile home to a new lot.

All of the above sentences sound more idiomatic to my semi-American ears. "Move house" sounds totally strange on t his side of the pond....Emotion: smile
Which side American or European ? Emotion: smile
what is scorrect

you are one of those people on whom i can count

or

you are one of those people whom i can count on
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Hi,

what is scorrect

you are one of those people on whom i can count

or

you are one of those people whom i can count on

Neither is correct, because you need capital letters and punctuation.

#1 is a bit more stylish than #2, but you can put the preposition in either position.

Best wishes, Clive
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