Hi all,
for a translation of an article I am looking for the correct english terms of the following item:
German "Etagenhangbau" = engl ???:
This is a form of agriculture of grassland on the slope of a hill in form of terraces
Thank you, Richard

Richard Müller - r-dot-mueller-at-oeko-sorpe-dot-de
Hi all, for a translation of an article I am looking for the correct english terms of the following item: German "Etagenhangbau" = engl ???: This is a form of agriculture of grassland on the slope of a hill in form of terraces

I don't think we have a proper word for it. I would just call it terrace-farming.

Andy Leighton => (Email Removed)
"The Lord is my shepherd, but we still lost the sheep dog trials" - Robert Rankin, They Came And Ate Us
Hi all, for a translation of an article I am ... on the slope of a hill in form of terraces

I don't think we have a proper word for it. I would just call it terrace-farming.

I've copied this enquiry to uk.business.agriculture. I'll report back.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in uk.culture.language.english)
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I don't think we have a proper word for it. I would just call it terrace-farming.

I've copied this enquiry to uk.business.agriculture. I'll report back.

I'm not convinced that the original German word means anything other than "terracing".

John Briggs
I've copied this enquiry to uk.business.agriculture. I'll report back.

I'm not convinced that the original German word means anything other than "terracing".

I think the safest option is to refer to terraces as "terraces" and the style of farming as "terrace farming", "farming on terraces" or something like that.
There are regional and specialist terms in use in Britain, but it would be wrong to apply these to anywhere else. Also they are not well-known.
In Scotland and the North of England naturally occuring ledges are sometimes called "run rigs" or "rigs".
The word "lynchet" is used in parts of England, and is a term used by archaeologists.
OED (Oxford English Dictionary):
lynchet
2. A slope or terrace along the face of a chalk down.

b. Archæol. A cultivation terrace.
1796 Gentl. Mag. LXVI. 822/1 On the declivities of theelevated and chalky tracts of Wiltshire, Dorsetshire, and other counties, there very frequently occurs a beautiful assemblage of terraces, mostly horizontal, and rising in a continued series like the steps of Egyptian pyramids... These, which are commonly arable,..are popularly called lynchets... They are generally regarded in the neighbourhood as the offspring of human exertion in remote ages, to facilitate and extend the dominion of the plough.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in uk.culture.language.english)
I've copied this enquiry to uk.business.agriculture. I'll report back.

I'm not convinced that the original German word means anything other than "terracing".

Some interesting etymology here, perhaps. Chambers (1972) gives for "Hanging garden" "a garden formed in terraces rising one above another," indicating a greater affinity with the Germanic Hang, meaning slope (retained in the the expression "with a hang to," meaning with a tendency towards), than with the customary "suspend". It certainly makes more sense than my childhood picture of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon as an oversized version of Grandpa's hanging baskets.

Noel
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Thanks to all. I'll use "terrace farming"!
Richard

Richard Müller - r-dot-mueller-at-oeko-sorpe-dot-de
Hi all, for a translation of an article I am looking for the correct english terms= of the following item: ... of grassland on the slope of a hill in form of terraces Thank you, Richard Richard M=FCller - r-dot-mueller-at-oeko-sorpe-dot-de

You mean like the rice field in Laos, on hillside ?

I think it's called terrace farming. Please check the following link to see if that's what you're looking for.
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