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a The actress attended the press screening for horror film, Candyman.

b The actress attended the press screening for horror film.



Is a correct as written?

Is it an english rule that the sentence must be at least contain an essential information, and be complete to take the comma?

b doesn't make sense alone nor does it look grammatical without a determiner, so is this perhaps just stylistic choice, in say newspapers, or is it an error to use a comma this way?


And


The new businesses venture.

Does this example require an apostrophe businesses'.


What would be multiple businesses if this is just one businesses' venture. (Would you have to say: the group of businesses venture, for instance?)

Or:

The sheeps in the field. (one sheep or multiple sheep)

The sheeps are in the field (multiple sheep).


The only thing different is the context.

Comments  

We may say: Sheep's verbally, not sheep is.

panda blue 483Is a correct as written?

No. You need an article with "horror film", and no comma. "The actress attended the press screening for the horror film Candyman."

panda blue 483is it an error to use a comma this way?

Yes. With the comma, it means that there is only one horror film, Candyman.

panda blue 483 Does this example require an apostrophe businesses'.

You should study the rules for formation of possessives. You seem to have them all mixed up. Any decent stylebook will cover it more clearly and thoroughly than I can here. But It's one business's venture or several businesses' ventures.

panda blue 483The only thing different is the context.

I'm going to say that there is no word "sheeps". The plural of "sheep" is "sheep". If you mean the contraction for "sheep is", you could answer "Where is the one sheep we own?" with "The sheep's in the field." If you have more than one sheep, it's "Where are the sheep?" "The sheep are in the field."