+0

He was reserved, not shy.
The rates were stable, up slightly than the day before.

a) She ran a successful business, now a wealthy millionaire.

b) He was released from prison, now a free man.


Any right or wrong in using an and conjunction with these examples?

Why doesn't example a) work like b). Example a doesn't quite sound right?



Is this example a list and therefore takes a comma, or is it a comma splice?


People are losing their jobs, worse still people are losing their lives, so we totally understand the perception.

+1
panda blue 483He was reserved, not shy.
The rates were stable, up slightly on / compared to the day before.

It may seem a little contradictory to say that the rates were both "stable" and "up slightly", though the word "slightly" does mitigate this, I suppose.

panda blue 483a) She ran a successful business, now a wealthy millionaire.
b) He was released from prison, now a free man.

Neither of these sentences works well.

panda blue 483People are losing their jobs, worse still people are losing their lives, so we totally understand the perception.

It is not glaringly wrong, but I don't find the punctuation entirely satisfactory. I might punctuate it like this:

People are losing their jobs – worse still people are losing their lives – so we totally understand the perception.