+0
Can anyone tell me the correct use of the apostrphe in this case?
A widower whose children often played with hers owned the farm adjoining the Gessen's.
Does this need an apostrophe? We are implying it is the Gessen's farm, so I think we do.

Terry and Ragsy would always be their children. Her's and Tru's.
Would Her's have the apostrophe?

Our bed or hers?
Should hers be her's?

In the following, should aunt be capitalized?
Ragsy adored her young aunt Hannah.
It was not until her aunt Hannah arrived that day. . .
Through the kitchen window, I could see my aunt Hannah.

I say not to capitalize the aunt because we are not saying "my" aunt hannah, which would be capped. Am I correct?
Comments  
Mom4ezCan anyone tell me the correct use of the apostrphe in this case?
A widower whose children often played with hers owned the farm adjoining the Gessen's.Apostrophe is needed. If the name is Gessens, it follows the 's'. If the name is Gessens some would add apostrophe + s.
Does this need an apostrophe? We are implying it is the Gessen's farm, so I think we do.

Terry and Ragsy would always be their children. Her's and Tru's. Hers and Tru's.
Would Her's have the apostrophe? No.

Our bed or hers?
Should hers be her's? Hers

In the following, should aunt be capitalized?
Ragsy adored her young aunt Hannah. Young Aunt Hannah = 'aunt' goes with the name. Otherwise, young aunt, Hannah.
It was not until her aunt Hannah arrived that day. . .
Through the kitchen window, I could see my aunt Hannah.

I say not to capitalize the aunt because we are not saying "my" aunt hannah, which would be capped. Am I correct?

Can anyone tell me the correct use of the apostrphe in this case?
A widower whose children often played with hers owned the farm adjoining the Gessen's.Apostrophe is needed. If the name is Gessens, it follows the 's'. If the name is Gessens some would add apostrophe + s.

I think I'd agree:

1. The farm that belongs to Mr and Mrs Gessen => The Gessens' farm.

2. The farm that belongs to Mr and Mrs Gessens => The Gessens' farm or The Gessens's farm or The Gessenses' farm.

MrP
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Can you tell me if this is the correct use of the apostrophe?

His name's Faud.

thanks!
Hi,

Yes.

Clive
MrPedantic2. The farm that belongs to Mr and Mrs Gessens => The Gessens' farm or The Gessens's farm or The Gessenses' farm.
Hello MrP

If there are two people whose name is Gessens, they are the Gessenses and in my opinion the plural genitive has to be used:

the Gessenses' farm

Cheers
CB
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Just a quick note:

<<Should hers be her's?>>

Never. There is no such word as her's (or their's or our's or your's).

CJ