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can you help me by suggesting how to improve the tenses of verbs in following sentences

(a) The steak served in the dinner last night tasted like a cardboard that was left in the train (b) The people I met in Italy were warm and friendly.They acted as though they always knew me

(c) Because I was so busy, Ihad bnot cleaned my desk for two weeks.

(d) Almost all the guests left by the time we arrived.

(e) In the German version of "Cindrella", one of the cruel stepsisters had cut her toes off so the slipper could fit her foot.
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Caesercan you help me by suggesting how to improve the tenses of verbs in following sentences

(a) The steak served in the dinner last night tasted like a cardboard that was left in the train (b) The people I met in Italy were warm and friendly.They acted as though they always knew me

(c) Because I was so busy, Ihad bnot cleaned my desk for two weeks.

(d) Almost all the guests left by the time we arrived.

(e) In the German version of "Cindrella", one of the cruel stepsisters had cut her toes off so the slipper could fit her foot.

a. no need for 'a' before cardboard...."had been left" "on the train"

b. as though they 'had always known me'

c. 'had left'

d. correct use of 'had cut' here.

In all the examples, the past perfect is prefered when describing an action that occured and ended before the time of another action expressed.
thanks a lot Philip

Kindly help me on two accounts

(a) Because Iwas so busy, I had not cleaned my desk for two weeks.Should Icorrect it as "have not cleaned"

(b) In (e) you mentioned that "had cut" needs to be corrected. should I write it as "has cut" or "cuts".

I am obliged

Caeser
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Shouldn't it be "had cut her own toes" ? (could have been Cinderella's ones)
PieanneShouldn't it be "had cut her own toes" ? (could have been Cinderella's ones)

Logically, I think you are correct, Pianne. However, grammatically, there is only one antecedent for her (step-sister) because Cinderella, herself, isn't really mentioned in the sentence (only the title of the work).
Let me start again - I was too hasty in my earlier reply.

(a) The steak served in the dinner last night tasted like a cardboard that was left in the train (b) The people I met in Italy were warm and friendly.They acted as though they always knew me

(c) Because I was so busy, Ihad bnot cleaned my desk for two weeks.

(d) Almost all the guests left by the time we arrived.

(e) In the German version of "Cindrella", one of the cruel stepsisters had cut her toes off so the slipper could fit her foot.

(a) "had been left on the the train" (no 'a' before 'cardboard')

(b) "they had always known me"

(c) I see this as correct.

(d) "we had arrived"

(e) I see this as correct.

In my haste before, I had left one item out and mislabeled others because of that.

My explanation stands....past perfect for actions completed before another past action.

Hope this helps!

Philip
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Hello Philip.
Not to be rude to you, in any way, but let me put a word (... a hairsplitting comment, indeed...). You wrote: [past perfect (stands) for actions completed before another past action]. There's no problem in this explanation, but the original sentences seem to be more tricky. This explanation applies only to (d), in those cases, doesn't it? (And it's not 'had left'?) I'd read 'had cut' in (e) as causative.
(Sorry again for my hairsplitting comment, apparently I'm a leisured person.)

Good day!
Hi Caeser, and Philip -- If I may, I'd like to ask about some aspects of this sentence other than the tenses of the verbs.

The steak served in the dinner last night tasted like a cardboard that was left in the train

"At dinner" would be more common that "in the dinner." (Unless it's a typo, and you mean "in the diner" - a diner is a type of casual American restaurant.) "Like cardboard" or "like a piece of cardboard" would be better than "like a cardboard." "On the train" would be better than "in the train" - but why would a bad steak be described as tasting like cardboard that had been left in the train? Is it possible that it should be "like cardboard that had been left (out) in the rain"? I would like to turn the whole sentence into "The steak served in the diner last night tasted like a piece of cardboard that had been left out in the rain." Am I hallucinating, or does any of this make sense to anyone else? Where does the sentence come from, anyway?
RoroHello Philip. Not to be rude to you, in any way, but let me put a word (... a hairsplitting comment, indeed...). You wrote: [past perfect (stands) for actions completed before another past action]. There's no problem in this explanation, but the original sentences seem to be more tricky. This explanation applies only to (d), in those cases, doesn't it? (And it's not 'had left'?) I'd read 'had cut' in (e) as causative. (Sorry again for my hairsplitting comment, apparently I'm a leisured person.) Good day!
(e) As a causative, wouldn't it have to be 'had her toes cut off' or 'had had her toes cut off'".
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