+0
A: Why didn't you purchase an earlier ticket? We'll be waiting 3 hours in LAX for the connecting flight.

B: We need the time for getting to the next gate. It could be in another terminal. In fact, I think 3 hour is barely enough given the tight security these days.

A: I hope you're right. The total flight time is only 5 hours but because of the multiple transits, the total travel time is 12 hours. That's about the time it takes to drive there. It defeats the purpose of flying.

B: You get to rest on plane which you don't get if you're driving. When you get there, you'd be so tried. Not to mention it's now snowing. Anything can happen.

A: Precisely. Planes can be grounded.

B: If that's the case, we could always rent a car.

A: Whatever. Just make sure somebody will be there to pick us up.

B: OK Honey <silently> (Bitch)

Please correct any mistakes!

Thanks!
Comments  
New2grammarA: Why didn't you purchase a ticket on an earlier flight ticket? We'll be waiting 3 hours in LAX for the connecting flight. (Why didn't you book an earlier flight?) (I'm not saying you'll never hear your version.)

B: We need the time for getting to the next gate. It could be in another terminal. In fact, I think 3 hours is barely enough, given the tight security these days.

A: I hope you're right. The total flight time is only 5 hours but because of the multiple transits (???), the total travel time is 12 hours. That's about the time it takes to drive there. It defeats the purpose of flying.

B: You get to rest on the plane which you don't get if you're driving. When you get there, you'd be so tried. Not to mention it's now snowing. Anything can happen. +++

A: Precisely. Planes can be grounded.

B: If that's the case, we could always rent a car.

A: Whatever. Just make sure somebody will be there to pick us up.

B: OK Honey <silently> (***)(???) As per our earlier discussions, "multiple transits" is not an expression we'd use in the US. It may fly perfectly well in UK.

+++These four sentences (BEmotion: smile, or rather the first two, need to be rearranged because of the way the conjunctions work. For example, you obviously won't get to sleepon the plane if you're driving.

If we drive, you'll be very / so tired when we get there. If we fly, you'll be able to rest during the flight (on the plane).

- A.
Arghh!! The transit thing really bothers me. It contradicts with what I've learned from another post between the difference between a transit and a stopover - I think it was answered by a UK native speaker. So you'll never say transit, instead you'd replace with stopover? And, what question do you ask to find out how long an air traveller spent in an airport for connecting flight?

I'd say Emotion: sad "How long was your transit?

By the way, is book equal to purchase? It bothers me a bit, I have to say.

Also, I prefer your rephrased sentences but I have no idea what's wrong with my sentences. I can't see what's wrong with the conjunction I chose?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Oh well, must be pondial, as Marius would say.

We'd probably use "layover." I think "stopover" to us is like on a cruise, where the ship docks so the patrons can visit the port, possibly overnight, and spend their money.

A layover is something you'd rather not have, and is considered a total waste of time. It's the price you pay for cheap flights as opposed to non-stop. It almost always involves a change of planes. As you say in your dialogue, it's nice to have a comfortable amount of time to find your next gate or terminal. We'd ask, "How long is / was your layover?" I've been in a few airports where it was necessary to catch a shuttle to get from one terminal to another, but you usually hoof it. Some airports have "moving sidwalks." Your bags are always transferred to the next plane for you, so you don't have to carry them around. I'm not sure why your other poster is obsessed with the transportation aspect of a plane change. Perhaps I'm confused.

If the plane touches down for 20 minutes to pick up fuel or a new crew, it might be called a "stopover." If it's just to pick up passengers, we'd simply say the plane stopped in San Diego to board some passengers. In general, the difference between a stopover and a layover would be the plane change.

Technically, to book a flight is to make a reservation, but these days it amounts to the same thing. Perhaps if you booked well in advance, you'd have until X days before the flight to pay. If you got the seats at a bargain price, they're not going to hold them forever if you don't pay. It's like making hotel reservations in Vegas. (Sometimes if you don't check in on time they'll give your rooms to somebody else, even if you've paid.)

The airlines and the passengers play a game with each other. The airlines overbook (sell more seats than they have) and the passengers make multiple reservations, just in case.

- A.
New2grammar You get to rest on plane which you don't get if you're driving. When you get there, you'd be so tried.
I didn't mean your choice of conjunctions was incorrect. I said, the way they work creates a problem. You have to work too hard to figure out which of your later phrases refer to the plane trip and which to the car trip.
Avangi, I really appreciate the additional information you're providing. It really helps me understand better. You suggested 'stopover' in the case of cruise where the ship docks to allow the passengers to visit the place. What would you say in the case of flights?

Let's say, I would like to recommend a friend to visit a beautiful city which is on his flight route. Can I use stopover as well?

Amy, I would suggest you stop over in Tokyo on your way to Shanghai. It's a wonderful city. I stopped over for a night when I went to Taiwan for a conference last year and it never regret it.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Yes, that's the way we'd say it in the US. - A.