+0
In order to receive the money in time, it is essential to hand in the application in advance, you said.

I am going to write the above sentence in a letter. The person to who I address this letter told me it would be necessary to hand in the particular application in advance. Is it fine?
1 2
Comments  
Andrei,

If you want to "quote" someone, you might want to write it as follows:

1) You said, "In order to receive the money in time, it is essential to hand in the application in advance."

If you want to reference an earlier conversation, you might want to write something like....

2) I recall from our earlier conversation that, in order to receive the money on time, it is essential to hand in the application in advance.

I prefer #2 as it is seems more friendly. "You said" implies you are holding someone to their word or their promise. "Our conversation" seems like we are both working towards the same goal.

A slightly more formal version is...

2a) I recall from our earlier conversation on June 30th that, in order to receive the money on time, it is essential to hand in the application in advance.

Here you have referenced a specific date. It implies a subtle hint of accountability. In other words, "remember when we spoke about this topic on this date, we said the following...."

Your original sentence...

3) In order to receive the money in time, it is essential to hand in the application in advance, you said.

needs quotation marks if you want to quote their discussion. The "you said" at the very end seems a bit awkward to me, though it is perfectly acceptable English.

Hope that helps. If this is still unclear, post back and someone will assist.
Hi, MountainHiker,

I think you've made slight change here. The original meaning should be "receive the money on time", a particular time that it was expected to happen. In your examples, I've noticed that you edited as "receive the money in time", an earlier time than expected.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think you've made slight change here. The original meaning should be "receive the money on time", a particular time that it was expected to happen. In your examples, I've noticed that you edited as "receive the money in time", an earlier time than expected.

I don't think I made a change. If we go back to the original post, Andrei said the following:

In order to receive the money in time, it is essential to hand in the application in advance, you said.

"In time", no?

You are correct in that "on time" means at a specific correct time. "In time" means any time up to and including the specific and correct time.

"Please be on time for our appointment." --Be "on time", don't be late.

"Please be there in time so that we can prepare for the marathon race." --Be there in advance so that we can go through our proper preparations.

Pastel, I think your grasp of this topic is excellent!

If I have misunderstood, please come back with further clarifications.
Oops, my falut.
I need my eyes examined. Thanks there.
I like reading your explanation. It's very elaborated and it definitely helps EFL/ESL learners a lot.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Pastel,

I like reading your explanation. It's very elaborate and it definitely helps EFL/ESL learners a lot.

Hey, that's great feedback.

Thank you very much!
You're quite welcome.
How does one activate italics with this text editor? How about underlining? Thanks.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more