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CBS is airing a new series called Swing Town. As the name implies, the show is about a town of swingers practicing polygamy. The network received tons of negative as well as positive feedback even before the debut. Due to its adult content, the much anticipated series is put in a later timeslot, a move critics call network desperation as steamy series are often associated with cable networks and movies. During an interview, the producer defended, saying "If you don't like it, don't watch". Wondering what's the lifestyle of swingers, I think I'm going to watch though I don't like XX films [help...it's shot in the 70s setting...what's the opposite of contemporary or modern] - contemporary or modern??? films are much better in general.

Please correct any mistakes.

Thanks.
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CBS is airing a new series called Swing Town Swingtown.

I'm not familiar with this show myself, but on the CBS website it's called "Swingtown". I'd probably put "Swingtown" in italics, or quotes, but this is really a style thing.

As the name implies, the show is about a town of swingers practicing polygamy.

"Polygamy" means being married to more than one person at the same time. Is that really the case here? Or are they just engaging in promiscuous sex?

The network received tons of negative as well as positive feedback even before the debut.

"Tons of" is a very informal expression that might be just a tad too casual here.

Due to its adult content, the much anticipated series is put in a later timeslot, a move critics call network desperation as steamy series are often associated with cable networks and movies.

The logic of this sentence doesn't really work for me. The alleged "desperation" logically seems to apply to the fact that they showed it at all, not the fact that they shunted it into a late timeslot. I also don't really see why steamy series are "associated with movies". Do you mean "steamy content/subject matter"?

If "network desperation" is a literal quote from critics then I'd put it in quotes. If it's not a literal quote then I'd consider rephrasing the sentence to avoid the impression that the quotes ought to be there but had been forgotten.

During an interview, the producer defended the decision, saying "If you don't like it, don't watch".

The verb "defend" can occasionally be intransitive ("I attacked and he defended.") but this is fairly rare and doesn't quite work for me here.

Wondering what's Being curious about the lifestyle of swingers, I think I'm going to watch, though I don't like *** films [help...it's shot in the 70s setting...what's the opposite of contemporary or modern] - contemporary or modern??? films are much better in general.

I'm not completely clear just from what you wrote if your preference depends on when the film is made or the period in which it's set. But I gather that this is a modern production set in the 1970s, so I guess you probably mean the latter. In fact, this show appears to be a drama series, not a film. There's a term "period drama" which means a drama set in a past time, but whether a drama set as recently as the 1970s would qualify as a "period drama" is questionable. I'd probably end up saying something like: "I don't like shows set in the past -- I much prefer shows with a modern/contemporary setting."

Your hyphen should be a dash, but probably you know that. When I can't be bothered to try to enter a proper dash I use two hyphens: "--".
CBS is airing a new series called Swing Town Swingtown.

I'm not familiar with this show myself, but on the CBS website it's called "Swingtown". I'd probably put "Swingtown" in italics, or quotes, but this is really a style thing.

Good Point

As the name implies, the show is about a town of swingers practicing polygamy.

"Polygamy" means being married to more than one person at the same time. Is that really the case here? Or are they just engaging in promiscuous sex?

You are right. It should be promiscuous sex. Thanks.

The network received tons of negative as well as positive feedback even before the debut.

"Tons of" is a very informal expression that might be just a tad too casual here.

The problem is I don't know a good substitute for it Emotion: sad Any suggestions?

Due to its adult content, the much anticipated series is put in a later timeslot, a move critics call network desperation as steamy series are often associated with cable networks and movies.

The logic of this sentence doesn't really work for me. The alleged "desperation" logically seems to apply to the fact that they showed it at all, not the fact that they shunted it into a late timeslot.

The logic is even though the content is steamy, the network decided to show it and simply move it to a latter slot which implies how desperate the network is. How would you repharase the sentence to make it work?

I also don't really see why steamy series are "associated with movies". Do you mean "steamy content/subject matter"? I agree. Sorry

If "network desperation" is a literal quote from critics then I'd put it in quotes. If it's not a literal quote then I'd consider rephrasing the sentence to avoid the impression that the quotes ought to be there but had been forgotten.

During an interview, the producer defended the decision, saying "If you don't like it, don't watch".

The verb "defend" can occasionally be intransitive ("I attacked and he defended.") but this is fairly rare and doesn't quite work for me here.

I see.

Wondering what's Being curious about the lifestyle of swingers, I think I'm going to watch, though I don't like *** films [help...it's shot in the 70s setting...what's the opposite of contemporary or modern] - contemporary or modern??? films are much better in general.

I'm not completely clear just from what you wrote if your preference depends on when the film is made or the period in which it's set. But I gather that this is a modern production set in the 1970s, so I guess you probably mean the latter. In fact, this show appears to be a drama series, not a film. There's a term "period drama" which means a drama set in a past time, but whether a drama set as recently as the 1970s would qualify as a "period drama" is questionable. I'd probably end up saying something like: "I don't like shows set in the past -- I much prefer shows with a modern/contemporary setting."

It's a modern production set in the 70s. I've always thought film included all types of motion pictures such as movies and drama series.

a. a sequence of images projected onto a screen, creating the illusion of movement

b. a form of entertainment in such a sequence of images Related adjective cinematic

Your hyphen should be a dash, but probably you know that. When I can't be bothered to try to enter a proper dash I use two hyphens: "--".

You are the first person to tell me that. What's the difference? Are there two different keys on the keyboard? When to use which?



Sorry for so many follow-up questions. You got many good points and I just wanted to make sure I get all your points.
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The network received tons of negative as well as positive feedback even before the debut.

"Tons of" is a very informal expression that might be just a tad too casual here.

The problem is I don't know a good substitute for it Emotion: sad Any suggestions?

"a great deal of" or "a large amount of" are the obvious choices that come to mind.

Due to its adult content, the much anticipated series is put in a later timeslot, a move critics call network desperation as steamy series are often associated with cable networks and movies.

The logic of this sentence doesn't really work for me. The alleged "desperation" logically seems to apply to the fact that they showed it at all, not the fact that they shunted it into a late timeslot.

The logic is even though the content is steamy, the network decided to show it and simply move it to a latter slot which implies how desperate the network is. How would you repharase the sentence to make it work?

To me, a more logical form of words would be something like:

The show's steamy subject matter is usually associated more with cable networks and movies [than with broadcast networks?], and critics call the move "network desperation". Due to its adult content, the much anticipated series is put in a later timeslot.

I think that something similar to the text I put in square brackets might be a good idea (it makes the contrast better), but I don't know if "broadcast network" is the correct US term.

I've always thought film included all types of motion pictures such as movies and drama series.

Hmm... I'm wondering if there might be a US/UK issue here. In the UK, in the context we're talking about (i.e. fictional shows on TV), "film" exclusively means "movie". A drama series would never be called a "film" (nor would a single episode). I thought that this was also true in the US, but it sounds as if I might be wrong...

Your hyphen should be a dash, but probably you know that. When I can't be bothered to try to enter a proper dash I use two hyphens: "--".

You are the first person to tell me that. What's the difference? Are there two different keys on the keyboard? When to use which?

Probably the best thing I can do is refer you to and .
Thank you so much, Mr. Wordy.

_- (I still can't find the dash key on my laptop keyboard and don't remember having it on my old desktop keyboard) For now, I'll use two hyphens as you suggested. Thanks again.
New2grammar
_- (I still can't find the dash key on my laptop keyboard and don't remember having it on my old desktop keyboard) For now, I'll use two hyphens as you suggested. Thanks again.

No, you won't have separate keys for dashes; there's some info about how to enter them at the references I gave. The two-hyphens method is good for ASCII-only text (where dashes aren't in the character set at all), or mediums such as email and discussion forums, but wouldn't be appropriate for a proper publication.
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Thanks for the advice. I found it.

In Unicode , the figure dash is U+2012 (decimal 8210). HTML authors must use the numeric forms or