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Can I say,

(a) His stall is opened / open every every morning.

(b) The cars stopped at the traffic light.

(c) The beekeeper is collecting from the honey combs.

(d) During the day time, they go swimming.

(e) When she reached the seaside, she saw many activities such as (a) volleyball match and (a) swimming contest. She joined the team and won the match.

(f) When they reached, they saw many children playing on the seaside.

(g) Last school holidays, they go / played parasailing.

Last school holidays, they planned for a picnic.

(h) The waiter is serving the food to the customers.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Ah well, if that is how you want it, who am I to argue.Emotion: sad

For me there is no problem - it is opened every day.
Feebs11Ah well, if that is how you want it, who am I to argue.Emotion: sad

For me there is no problem - it is opened every day.
What I said is stated in an English usage book. It is not my reasoning. If I've the time, I'll look for the book and tell you its title.

Best wishes
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Feebs11Ah well, if that is how you want it, who am I to argue.Emotion: sad

For me there is no problem - it is opened every day.
Hi Feebs,

The reason for my reopening the topic was that I think many learners rely on the “Book” for every grammar needs, which is nothing wrong. But debating on arguments based on what they read from the book is rather frustrating. Whether it’s “opened” or “open”, to me it has to be relevant to the context. I know either one will probably get the idea across in most cases, just the question of what part of the speech should be used. That’s all,
Hi everybody

I don't have any objections to "It is opened every day." This is a passive verb construction referring to individual, daily activities. It may well be the case that it is not always the same person who opens the stall each day.

I have much more of a problem with the following sentence:
"The new supermarket has been opened for business for 2 weeks."

When the expression "open for business" is used with the present perfect along with a period of time ("has been open for business for two weeks"), it is generally a reference to a "grand opening" -- i.e. the first day and subsequent state of doing business -- and describes the new state of the supermarket.

Using the passive form of the verb 'open' in the sentence above would stress individual, specific daily acts of opening the door(s) of the supermarket so that business could be done. This usage would suggest that there is some sort of specialreason or circumstance to stress the fact that the supermarket has opened its doors every day for the last two weeks in order to do business. (It is not unusual at all for any business to unlock its doors at the beginning of each business day in order to do business.) So, if the passive form of the verb is used, it suggests that perhaps the supermarket had to be forcibly opened. Maybe the manager of the new supermarket couldn't unlock the door on any of the previous 14 days and had to call a locksmith to open the door for him. Emotion: smile

The passive could be used to talk about some reason other than"for business" for the supermarket (or someone else) to open the door(s) every day. Perhaps in the past, the door to the new supermarket was opened every day in order to air the place out or to allow construction workers in. Emotion: smile

If no special or weird circumstances apply, then it would be much more typical to say:
"The new supermarket has been open for business for 2 weeks."
Yoong Liat
His stall is opened every morning. ( The word 'opened' is, IMO, not correctly used because it is a verb.)

His stall is opened by the owner/ the owner's assistant, etc every morning. (This sentence is fine as there is a subject, the doer.)

Once his stall is opened by the owner, his stall is open. (here 'open' is an adjective)

His stall is open every morning. (Here the adjective 'open' means 'not closed')

Liat,

When we used the word “opened” as a verb, the agent is not always included. So when Feeb said “ the store is opened” in passive voice, it’s equal in meaning to “store is open” which you believe is correct.

Try to picture this:

I walked into the kitchen and I found the pantry door “opened” with cookie crump scattered all over the floor. I shouted to the kids “Who was in the pantry?”.

Do you see “opened” as incorrectly used?
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Hi Goodman

I'd prefer "I found the pantry door open and there were cookie crumbs scattered all over the floor."
The word 'open' describes the state of the door.
YankeeHi Goodman

I'd prefer "I found the pantry door open and there were cookie crumbs scattered all over the floor."
The word 'open' describes the state of the door.

Hi Amy,

I just knew you couldn't resistEmotion: big smile. I've come to this conclusion. The difference between your view and mine is how we perveive the sentence and apply the logic. My view is that with the cookie crumps on the floor, someone had to opened the pantry door becasue the door couldn't have opened itself. My version implied the passive state that it was opened by an agent and yours chose to express it in the adjective state. It's a matter of view rather than grammar in my estimation. Now I know, I am not the only one with this logic.
I don't have any objections to "It is opened every day." This is a passive verb construction referring to individual, daily activities. It may well be the case that it is not always the same person who opens the stall each day.

I agree with Amy.

I'd prefer "I found the pantry door open and there were cookie crumbs scattered all over the floor."
The word 'open' describes the state of the door.

I also agree with Amy on the above; 'open' is the appropriate word as it describes a state.

The stall is open 24 hours a day. ('open' here also describes a state)

According to an English authority, it is incorrect to say "The stall is opened 24 hours a day."

We may say that somebody opened (verb) the stall, and once it is opened (verb) , the stall is open (adjective) for business. (Here again, 'open' describes a state, not the action of opening the stall.)
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We had been on this road before and the dialog has lost its appeal. We are going round and round with this same argument about “opened” and “open”. Your preference means that the word was not really incorrect but merely your choice. We have to determine whether the proper word is used by the full context of the passage or paragraph, not just a couple of sentences. I’ll go with your suggestion on “the store is open 24 hours”. There is nothing to debate there.

How I used “opened” and how you perceived it should be used, as I said, is a matter of perception and applying the logic.

The reason this discussion was “reopened” was because Feebs11’s post. One more food- for-thought scenario before I shall drop this discussion:

It’s in the morning. Mary has just arrived at the bank where she works as the branch manager. As she pulls up to the parking lot, she knew something was not right. Police was present. The bank has been only “opened” for 5 minutes. She parked her car and walked toward the police at the entrance to identify herself. The police told her the vault was found “opened” by the assistant manager when she “opened” the branch for business as usual. She told the police that she has worked at this branch since it was “opened” 10 years ago and never had any thing like this happened.

By the way, thanks all for the reply. I mean no ill feelingsEmotion: smile

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