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Can I say,

(a) His stall is opened / open every every morning.

(b) The cars stopped at the traffic light.

(c) The beekeeper is collecting from the honey combs.

(d) During the day time, they go swimming.

(e) When she reached the seaside, she saw many activities such as (a) volleyball match and (a) swimming contest. She joined the team and won the match.

(f) When they reached, they saw many children playing on the seaside.

(g) Last school holidays, they go / played parasailing.

Last school holidays, they planned for a picnic.

(h) The waiter is serving the food to the customers.
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Comments  (Page 3) 
The store is closed/close 5 hours a day.

'closed' is both an adjective which has the opposite meaning of open and a passive verb, am I right?
New2grammarThe store is closed/close 5 hours a day.

'closed' is both an adjective which has the opposite meaning of open and a passive verb, am I right?

Hi New2,

You are correct. What has been discussed here about "open" applies to "close" as well.

I went to the post office to send a package only to find out the branch has been closed for remodeling since last month.
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Hi N2G

No, that is not correct.

You can only say "The store is closed 5 hours a day." and the word 'closed' is an adjective in that sentence. It is definitely not used as a verb in the passive voice.
.
Goodman
New2grammarThe store is closed/close 5 hours a day.

'closed' is both an adjective which has the opposite meaning of open and a passive verb, am I right?
Hi New2,

You are correct. What has been discussed here about "open" applies to "close" as well.

I went to the post office to send a package only to find out the branch has been closed for remodeling since last month.
Sorry, Goodman, but your post is very misleading, IMO.

The word 'close' when used as an adjective means the same thing as the adjective 'near'.
The word 'open' when used as an adjective is the opposite of the adjective 'closed'.
.
.
New2grammar
The store is closed/close 5 hours a day.

'closed' is both an adjective which has the opposite meaning of open and a passive verb, am I right?

The store is closed/close 5 hours a day. ('close' means 'near')

7-eleven is always close (meaning 'near'), but never closed. (meaning 'always open'.)

'closed' is both an adjective which has the opposite meaning of open and a passive verb, am I right? You're right.

The store is closed today.

It was open (not 'opened') yesterday.

The store is closed today, but it was open yesterday.

The other store was closed yesterday, but it is open today.

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Hi YL

Those are good examples.
Thanks everyone! It's crystal clear Emotion: smile
You are right. Sorry, I goofed ! “Closed” and “Close” are not comparable to “opened” and “open”. I stand corrected and retracted my statement. I must have a mind lapse when I wrote the post.
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Further examples:

Because we're having a big clearance sale, we opened our store two hours earlier than usual yesterday.
(opened is a verb: simple past tense of the verb open in the active voice)

The store was opened at 7:00 a.m. yesterday -- in other words, they unlocked their doors two hours earlier than usual.
(was opened is the simple past tense of the verb open in the passive voice)

The store was open until midnight.
(open is an adjective. It describes a state.)

At midnight we closed the store.
(closed is a verb: simple past tense, active voice)

They wanted to go shopping at 12:30 a.m., but the store was closed.
(closed is an adjective. It describes a state.)

The store was closed at midnight.
(In this sentence it is not clear whether the word closed is intended to be part of the passive form of the verb close, or whether the word closed is intended only as a description of the state that existed at midnight.)
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