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The correctness of the English langlange is as much about the correct grammar as is about idiomaticness. Having a grammatically correct written sentence doesn't alone guarantee it to be correct altogether - it has to idiomatic too. In other words, correct grammar plus idiomaticness makes a correct sentence. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

For example, both of the following sentences are arguably grammatically correct but only the #1 is 'actually' correct because it's also idiomatic. Correct?

1: I beg of you.
2: I beg from you.

Please help me. Thanks.
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Jackson6612Please correct me if I'm wrong.
I don't think you're wrong, but it's really a matter of definition. Not everyone agrees on what constitutes correctness. You must at least recognize a range of standards.

Is a convoluted sentence incorrect simply because you have to read it ten times to figure out what it means?

If the writer misuses a term, or simply uses the wrong word - but everyone knows what he means - is it correct?

Do you always agree when someone tells you a sentence is incorrect?

Do you think standards are generally too tight, or too loose?

BTW, may I beg a quarter from you? Emotion: mmm
By the way, "idiomaticness" is very low on the idiomaticness scale.
(But it's probably better than "idiomaticity.")
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khoffBy the way, "idiomaticness" is very low on the idiomaticness scale.(But it's probably better than "idiomaticity.")
Random House Dictionary doesn't recognize idiomaticness at all. It offers idiomaticalness and idiomaticity,nothing else. I kind of like the latter.Emotion: smile If neither word sounds idiomatic to native ears, what noun would they use? Or is there no idiomatic noun at all in English?

CB
I meant to mention that, guys, but I forgot. Guess I was having too much fun!

[D] Emotion: beer
Cool Breeze
khoffBy the way, "idiomaticness" is very low on the idiomaticness scale.(But it's probably better than "idiomaticity.")
Random House Dictionary doesn't recognize idiomaticness at all. It offers idiomaticalness and idiomaticity, nothing else. I kind of like the latter. If neither word sounds idiomatic to native ears, what noun would they use? Or is there no idiomatic noun at all in English?CB
Thanks a lot, everyone. My M-W's Col. doesn't list "idiomaticity" as a word - according to it the noun for 'idiomatic' is "idiomaticness". I have just checked the M-W Unabridged which also goes along the same lines. I'm confused!Emotion: thinking
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Jackson6612I'm confused! Emotion: thinking
So am I!Emotion: big smile I think this only proves that English has a large vocabulary but it's unidiomatic to use the words.

CB

PS I cannot log in at the moment. Clearing the cookies doesn't help.
Jackson6612I'm confused! Emotion: thinking
So am I!Emotion: big smile I think this just proves that English has a large vocabulary but it's unidiomatic to use the words.

CB

PS The log-in problem unexpectedly solved itself.
Cool Breeze The log-in problem unexpectedly solved itself.
Did you read my thread in the "Help" forum? I thought I was the only one!
Well, your problem may have been a bit different. I was in ROM mode! Emotion: big smile (I could read, but I couldn't write!)

By the way, do we use "idioticity" or "idioticness"?

Hmmm, the great authority "Scrabble" has only "idiotism." I think it refers to an example, rather than the quality.
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