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Has the not only-but also correlative conjunction been used properly in the following sentence?
“I’d say not only are you going to lose all your old clients, but you’re also not going to get any new ones either."
I am open to suggestions on modifying the syntax so that the use of the correlative conjunction is correct. However, I'm also looking to make minimal changes (as the quoted material is part of a casual dialogue), if any at all, so please keep this in mind, if you will. Thank you all so much for your help and time.
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I'd do this:

I’d say you're not only going to lose all your old clients, but you’re also not going to get any new ones.
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Thank you very much, Mister Micawber.

The original drafted line of dialogue looked like this:
"I’d say not only are you going to lose all your old clients, you’re not going to get any new ones either."

I am a bit confused about how to advise the writer on this issue. Because the writer has used "not only," from an editorial standpoint, I am inclined to advise him to tack on "but also." However, this sentence is supposed to be part of a causal discussion. So perhaps it can be left alone and still be considered acceptable (since most people do not employ perfect grammar in their everyday conversations).

Any other ideas? Thanks again!
I agree: leave it alone. It flows much better and sounds more naturally. One of the problems I saw with the one you posted was the redundance of 'but also' and 'either'.
Aha! Thank you for your input and for pointing out the redundancy issue. Very best to you.
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