+0
I am writing now to inquire about something you may be seeing it most strange. However, I would like to ask you. I want to know whether or not anyone can know the details of a member such as "his email, and his real name" with which he registered at your forum. Is that permissible for you to give such information to anyone asking you? Or these information is secret. In other words, if anyone wanted to know my real name and my email with which I have registered, might you be giving him it?

Hoping forward to receiving your response at your earliest convenience.
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
Thank you so much indeed,

I think you forgot to reply me for this:

But I think that sentence can be written either 'something which you might be seeing most strange." As long as 'which' is objective pronoun, we can omit it.
Or 'something which might be most strange to you.

I don't want to repeat 'to you' as in yours, except in case if 'something' is the subject.
...something [which] you might be seeing most strange.[ something is direct object; however, 'most strange' is an object complement]
...something which might be most strange to you
...something [which] you might think most strange.
...something which might be thought most strange to you.
...something which might appear strange to you

By the way this is picture:

Could you kindly reply me to close this issued completely?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think you forgot to reply to me for this:

But I think that sentence can be written either 'something which you might be seeing most strange." As long as 'which' is objective pronoun, we can omit it.
Or 'something which might be most strange to you.

Yes, that is true.
That is something which appeals to her. - which is required.
That is someone (who) she has corresponded with. - who is optional

Here are the original sentences:
I am writing now to inquire about something you may be seeing it most strange.
I am writing to ask about something you might see as a strange thing.

I was not commenting on your syntax, but the naturalness of the expression as read by a native speaker.

These sentences are in order from quite natural to very awkward:

I am writing now to inquire about something which might seem very strange
I am writing now to inquire about something which might appear strange to you
I am writing now to inquire about something [which] you might think most strange.
I am writing now to inquire about something which might be most strange to you
I am writing now to inquire about something which might be thought most strange to you.