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I am writing now to inquire about something you may be seeing it most strange. However, I would like to ask you. I want to know whether or not anyone can know the details of a member such as "his email, and his real name" with which he registered at your forum. Is that permissible for you to give such information to anyone asking you? Or these information is secret. In other words, if anyone wanted to know my real name and my email with which I have registered, might you be giving him it?

Hoping forward to receiving your response at your earliest convenience.
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Websites are properties that comply with the regulations and legislation of that country. So if a legal authority demand for information, then the website is obliged to give the information. Or even if there is not a legal mandatory then still site owner or someone who can reach your information, can provide your information but it is a pure ethical issue.
The correct one could be the following:

[It is not the unique way, I just got the information you gave to write it in a more common way]
The biggest erros, I think they were:
"writing now" (Not nice)
Repeating the same idea too many times, without relating one phrase with the other ones.

I am writing to ask about something you might see as a strange thing. However, I need to know it: can any one get private data from registered users in your formus. When saying private data I mean some like his email or real name, for instance.
Are you allowed to do it? I need to know that if it is possible that someone can access my data if I join your forum.
I am looking forward to your answer.
Thank you,
Your NAME.

I am not English, and this may not be Perfect, but i hope it serves you.
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I am writing now to inquire about something which may seen you may be seeing it most strange to you. However, I would like to ask you. I want to know whether or not anyone can know the personal details of a member such as his email address, and his real name; or any such information with which he entered when he registered at your forum. Is it permissible for you to give such information to anyone who asks you? Or is this information kept secret? In other words, if anyone wanted to know my account information (my real name and my email address) with which I have registered, might you be giving it to him ?

Hoping forward to receivingI hope to receive your response at your earliest convenience.
AlpheccaStarsI am writing now to inquire about something which may seen you may be seeing it most strange to you.
I was intending to use Modal + continuous infinitive (be + V1+ing)
I am writing...............something you may /might be seeing most strange.
AlpheccaStars might you be giving it to him ?
I know that "him" is indirect object and " it" direct object. And as far as I know that we can say:
I have given it to you.
I have given you it.
AlpheccaStarsHoping forward to receivingI hope to receive your response at your earliest convenience.
Looking forward to receiving ...........
Mohammad LardhiI was intending to use Modal + continuous infinitive (be + V1+ing)I am writing...............something you may /might be seeing most strange.
You may be seeing it most strange to you.

This is very awkward and unnatural. I know that "to you" is not an indirect object, but the form is so close that it just does not work.

These are OK:

You may be seeing it from a different point of view.
You might be seeing Dave next week. He will be in town.

It might appear strange to you.
You might think it strange. (strange is an object complement)
Mohammad LardhiI have given you it.
This combination is not used with the pronoun "it".
OK I give it to you.
Wrong: I give you it.

OK: I give you the letter.
Mohammad LardhiLooking forward to receiving ...
It is a fragment, not a sentence. The participle "looking" is not a finite verb form. When you write formal letters, use complete sentences.
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AlpheccaStars.You may be seeing it most strange to you.This is very awkward and unnatural. I know that "to you" is not an indirect object, but the form is so close that it just does not work.These are OK:You may be seeing it from a different point of view.You might be seeing Dave next week. He will be in town.It might appear strange to you.You might think it strange. (strange is an object complement)
Thank you so much indeed,

But I think that sentence can be written either 'something which you might be seeing most strange." As long as 'which' is objective pronoun, we can omit it.
Or 'something which might be most strange to you.

I don't want to repeat 'to you' as in yours, except in case if 'something' is the subject.
...something [which] you might be seeing most strange.[ something is direct object; however, 'most strange' is an object complement]
...something which might be most strange to you
...something [which] you might think most strange.
...something which might be thought most strange to you.
...something which might appear strange to you
AlpheccaStarsIt is a fragment, not a sentence. The participle "looking" is not a finite verb form. When you write formal letters, use complete sentences.
I know that:
I look forward to + v ..... Formal
I am looking forward to + v+ ing----- informal

Thus, 'Looking forward to + v+ing------ informal

But what I didn't know is why you said 'It is a fragment, not a sentence' As far as I know that we can add what we want to add after these expressions
Could you please reply me to close this issue?
I look forward to + v ..... Formal
I am looking forward to + v+ ing----- informal
Thus, 'Looking forward to + v+ing------ informal

Not exactly.

These two are both correct, formal or informal.
I look forward to your reply. (simple present tense - look)
I am looking forward to your reply. (present progressive tense, - am looking)

This is a fragment:
Looking forward to your reply. (looking is a participle, it is not a finite verb. To be proper, a sentence must have a subject and a verb. This fragment has neither.)
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