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‎1. I was watching him sitting on the bench.

This normally implies "I was watching him and he was sitting on the bench", but what would the sentence imply if there is a comma between him and sitting as below?

2. I was watching him, sitting on the bench.

Does this one imply "I was watching him and I was sitting on the bench"?

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A thousand commas would not help. That is just bad writing in either form. Find a different way to say what you mean. Use more words.

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anonymousanonymous

Do you think even with the comma, in 2, is "sitting on the bench" referring to "him"?

So for this reason, do you think a thousand commas don't help in any way?

fire1Do you think even with the comma, in 2, is "sitting on the bench" referring to "him"?

"I was watching him, sitting on the bench."

Sorry, but that does not sound like good English to me, with or without a comma. Who is sitting where is not immediately clear, and the participle's role is muddy. I would put it "I was sitting on the bench watching him." In fiction or in dialogue, you could add a comma to it if you wanted: "He was standing by the railing of the boardwalk looking out to sea. I was sitting on the bench, watching him. He was so intent on his nose-picking that he didn't notice me. He was really trophy-hunting up there. I slipped my dart pistol from its holster and took careful aim. I would have only one shot at this. …."

It's a good question. I don't know the answer but If I read it like that, I also wouldn't know who was setting on the bench you or him.

I can make your sentence clearer without needing to use a comma or even "and", and that's by saying:

"I was watching him while he was sitting on the bench."

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