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Hi teachers,
Could you correct or confirm this definition please?
The present perfect with a present time marker refers to unfinished time periods and suggests that more actions or situations are possible during the time mentioned in the sentence.

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  
Thinking SpainThe present perfect with a present time marker
Could you give me an example? Do you mean when the present time is unfinished, like 'today', 'this week'? Then I think your definition needs refining, since I would consider 'now' a present time marker also.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for your reply.
Do you mean when the present time is unfinished, like 'today', 'this week'? Yes, I do.
Sure I can.
Sharon has studied Spanish this week.
Robert has had an early breakfast this month.

TS
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Sharon has studied Spanish this week.
Robert has had an early breakfast this month.

Well, the second one is odd—he must be very, very hungry by now. More lessons and breakfasts are indeed possible, but the sentences in themselves say nothing about that; they only indicate (if the verb form is correct) that the week and the month are not yet finished.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for your reply.
Well, the second one is odd—he must be very, very hungry by now. Emotion: rofl You are very right.
Is this one better?
Robert has gone out of the house early this month.

TS
Mister MicawberThen I think your definition needs refining, since I would consider 'now' a present time marker also.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for this one. That's true!
Is it more accurate now?
The present perfect with a present time marker, except 'now', refers to unfinished time periods and suggests that more actions or situations are possible during the time mentioned in the sentence.

Present Time Markers
Today, this morning, this afternoon, tonight, this weekend, this week, this month, this year, until today, etc.

TS
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Personally, I cannot guarantee that 'now' is the only exception, but otherwise it seems fine.
Mister MicawberPersonally, I cannot guarantee that 'now' is the only exception, but otherwise it seems fine.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for your reply. But it's closer now, isn't it?

TS
Yes.

And going out of the house only once a month is odd behavior, too.
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